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1.1 Introduction to the Manual

5. Terminology - A glossary of terms which have a technical significance or for which abbreviations may be used in the text, is provided in the Keywords Appendix, which can be accessed from the left hand menu.

1.1 Introduction to the Manual

1. Context - These procedures have been drawn up from the government: Working Together to Safeguard Children 2015. These procedures have been written in such a way as to encourage closer working between agencies regarding the assessment of need, the planning and the delivery of services. The purpose be

1.1 Introduction to the Manual

4. Relevant Staff - The contents of this manual are for application by staff in the following agencies with responsibilities for children in Surrey. Surrey Children's and Safeguarding Service; Surrey Police Service and the Transport Police; All Health Services and Health Professionals; County Council Services

1.1 Introduction to the Manual

3. Accessing Guidance and Protocols - Where there is relevant government guidance on a particular issue, reference is made to it in the procedure chapter and a link provided to the relevant website.  

1.1 Introduction to the Manual

2. Relationship of Policy, Procedure and Guidance - Policy The Surrey Safeguarding Children Board Policy is articulated in the Policy Principles and Values Procedure. If necessary, agencies may develop supplementary 'internal' policies which represent higher standards or which reflect an agency-specific contribution to safeguarding children

2.1 Policy, Principles and Values

This chapter was reviewed and revised in August 2013.

2.1 Policy, Principles and Values

2. Key Principles and Values - Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children is defined as: Protecting children from maltreatment; Preventing impairment of children’s health and development; Ensuring that children grow up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care; Taking action to

2.1 Policy, Principles and Values

1. Introduction - The work of Surrey Safeguarding Children Board (SSCB) is part of the wider context of integrated services for children that aim to improve the overall well-being of all children living in the area.. Safeguarding Children Boards were established under the Children Act 2004, as part of the i

2.1 Policy, Principles and Values

3. Race, Ethnicity and Culture - Children and families from black and minority ethnic groups may be suffering from, or to have experience of racial abuse. This form of abuse can cause Significant Harm and, when it is known to be occurring, could mean the child and or family concerned will be in need of services or protect

2.2 Surrey Safeguarding Children Board

8. Annual Report - The Independent Chair of the SSCB publishes an Annual Report which reports upon the effectiveness of safeguarding and promotes the welfare of children in the local area. The report lists the contribution made to the SSCB by partner agencies and details of what the SCB has spent. The report

2.2 Surrey Safeguarding Children Board

9. Media Interest in Child Abuse - Final reports of Serious Case Reviews must be published, including the SSCB’s response to the review findings on the SSCB’s website, for a minimum of 12 months. It is the responsibility of senior managers in each agency, and the Surrey Safeguarding Children Board (SSCB) Chair to antici

2.2 Surrey Safeguarding Children Board

The Children Act 2004 required each local authority to establish a Safeguarding Children Board. The Surrey Safeguarding Children Board (SSCB) was established on 1st April 2006. Chapter 3 of Working Together to Safeguard Children 2015 sets out in detail the arrangements for the work of each

2.2 Surrey Safeguarding Children Board

7. Annual Business Plan - The SSCB produces an annual business plan setting out the priorities for the SSCB: The Business Plan reports on: Progress and achievements in the previous budget year; A work programme for the following year to include measurable objectives; Relevant management information on child protect

2.2 Surrey Safeguarding Children Board

6. Structure - To assist the SSCB with its objectives the SSCB has a supporting structure and the Terms of Reference for each of the groups are available through the SSCB web site.

2.2 Surrey Safeguarding Children Board

1. Role and Functions - The Surrey Safeguarding Children Board (SSCB) is the key statutory mechanism for agreeing how the relevant organisations in Surrey will co-operate to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and to ensure the effectiveness of what the member organisations do individually and collectiv

2.2 Surrey Safeguarding Children Board

3. Accountability - Whilst the SSCB has a role in coordinating and ensuring the effectiveness of local individuals’ and organisations’ work to safeguard and promote the welfare of children, it is not accountable for their operational work. Each Board partner retains its own existing lines of accountabilit

2.2 Surrey Safeguarding Children Board

2. Scope of the Role - SSCB’s role includes the safeguarding and promoting the welfare of Children; this is defined in Working Together to Safeguard Children 2015 as: Protecting children from maltreatment; Preventing impairment of children’s health and development; Ensuring that children grow up in circumsta

2.2 Surrey Safeguarding Children Board

5. Membership - The SSCB is made of organisations which will designate particular, named people as their SSCB member so that there is a consistency and continuity in membership. Members will be those with a strategic role in relation to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children within their organ

2.2 Surrey Safeguarding Children Board

4. Integration with Other Forums - It is important that safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children is seen as part of the wider context of the Children and Young People's Partnership and that the SSCB’s policies, guidance and procedures such as these, reflect and contribute to the wider goals of improving the well

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

14. Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service - The responsibility of the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service (Cafcass), as set out in the Children Act 1989, is to safeguard and promote the welfare of individual children who are the subject of family court proceedings. It achieves this by providing independent social

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

13. UK Visas and Immigration (Formerly The United Kingdom Border Agency) - Section 55 of the Borders, Citizenship and Immigration Act 2009 places upon the UK Visas & Immigration a duty to take account of the need to safeguard and promote the welfare of children in discharging its functions. Statutory guidance Arrangements to Safeguard and Promote Children

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

15. The Armed Services - Local authorities have the statutory responsibility for safeguarding and promoting the welfare of the children of service families in the UK. In discharging these responsibilities: Local authorities should ensure that the Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, and Families Association Forces Help, the

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

17. Faith Organisations - Churches, other places of worship and faith-based organisations provide a wide range of activities for children and have an important role in safeguarding children and supporting families. Like other organisations who work with children they need to have appropriate arrangements in place t

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

12. Youth Offending Teams - Youth Offending Teams (YOTs) are subject to the section 11 duties set out in paragraph 4 of this chapter. YOTs are multi-agency teams responsible for the supervision of children and young people subject to pre-court interventions and statutory court disposals. [11] They are therefore well

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

16. Voluntary and Private Services - Voluntary organisations and private sector providers play an important role in delivering services to children. They should have the arrangements described in paragraph 4 of this chapter in place in the same way as organisations in the public sector, and need to work effectively with the L

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

6. Adult Social Care Services - Local authorities provide services to adults who are responsible for children who may be in need. These services are subject to the section 11 duties set out in paragraph 4 of this chapter. When staff are providing services to adults they should ask whether there are children in the family

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

2. Schools and Colleges - Section 175 of the Education Act 2002 places a duty on local authorities (in relation to their education functions and governing bodies of maintained schools and further education institutions, which include sixth-form colleges) to exercise their functions with a view to safeguarding and p

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

11. The Secure Estate for Children - Governors, managers and directors of the following secure establishments are subject to the section 11 duties set out in paragraph 4 of this chapter: A secure training centre; A young offender institution; Accommodation provided by or on behalf of a local authority for the purpose of restr

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

3. Early Years and Childcare - Early years providers have a duty under section 40 of the Childcare Act 2006 to comply with the welfare requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage.[1] Early years providers should ensure that: Staff complete safeguarding training that enables them to recognise signs of potential abus

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

5. Police - The police are subject to the section 11 duties set out in paragraph 4 of this chapter. Under section 1(8)(h) of the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011 the police and crime commissioner must hold the Chief Constable to account for the exercise of the latter’s duties in rela

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

4. Health Services -   NHS organisations are subject to the section 11 duties set out in paragraph 4 of this chapter. Health professionals are in a strong position to identify welfare needs or safeguarding concerns regarding individual children and, where appropriate, provide support. This includes understand

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

1. Shared Responsibilities - Section 11 of the Children Act 2004 places duties on a range of organisations and individuals to ensure their functions, and any services that they contract out to others, are discharged having regard to the need to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. Various other statutory dut

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

10. Probation Providers - Probation Trusts are subject to the section 11 duties set out in paragraph 4 of this chapter. They are primarily responsible for providing reports for courts and working with adult offenders both in the community and in the transition from custody to community to reduce their reoffending.

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

9. Prison Service - The Prison Service is subject to the section 11 duties set out in paragraph 4 of this chapter. It also has a responsibility to identify prisoners who pose a risk of harm to children.[7] Where an individual has been identified as presenting a risk of harm to children, the relevant prison es

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

8. British Transport Police - The British Transport Police (BTP) is subject to the section 11 duties set out in paragraph 4 of this chapter. In its role as the national police for the railways, the BTP can play an important role in safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children, especially in identifying and suppor

2.3 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

7. Housing Authorities - Housing and homelessness services in local authorities and others at the front line such as environmental health organisations are subject to the section 11 duties set out in paragraph 4 of this chapter. Professionals working in these services may become aware of conditions that could have

2.4 Information Sharing

RELEVANT READING Multi Agency Working and Information Sharing Project Final report July 2014 (Home Office). AMENDMENT This chapter was updated in October 2015 in regard to Information sharing: Advice for practitioners providing safeguarding services to children, young people, parents and c

2.4 Information Sharing

3. Seven Golden Rules for Information Sharing - The HM Government guidance Information sharing: Advice for practitioners providing safeguarding services to children, young people, parents and carers (March 2015) provides seven golden rules for Information Sharing; Remember that the Data Protection Act is not a barrier to sharing informa

2.4 Information Sharing

4. Sharing Information Where There are Concerns About Significant Harm - Professionals who work with, or have contact with children, parents or adults in contact with children, should always share information with Surrey Children's Services where they have reasonable cause to suspect that a child may be suffering or may be at risk of suffering Significant Harm.

2.4 Information Sharing

1. Introduction - This procedure should be read in conjunction with HM Government Information sharing: Advice for practitioners providing safeguarding services to children, young people, parents and carers (March 2015) and Surrey County Council Multi Agency Information Sharing Protocol for Surrey. A key fac

2.4 Information Sharing

2. Agency Responsibility Under Children Act 2004 - The statutory guidance on Section 11 of the Children Act 2004 states that in order to safeguard and promote children's welfare, the agencies covered by Section 11 should make arrangements to ensure that: All professionals in contact with children understand what to do and the most effectiv

3.1 Recruitment, Supervision and Training of Staff

9. Whistle Blowing - Staff, through fears about repercussions, may find it difficult to raise child protection concerns about colleagues or managers. Each agency should ensure the provision of a well-publicised ‘whistle blowing’ or ‘speak out’ procedure using a direct specialist telephone line, that pr

3.1 Recruitment, Supervision and Training of Staff

The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) was established under the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 and merges the functions previously carried out by the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) and Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA). The relevant legislation is set out in theProtection of Fre

3.1 Recruitment, Supervision and Training of Staff

8. Reporting Systems for Unsuitable Staff - Each agency must have a nominated/named ‘human resource' or service manager whose responsibilities include reporting to the Disclosure and Barring Service and relevant professional body, any member of staff who (following an enquiry) it concludes to be unsuitable to work with children.

3.1 Recruitment, Supervision and Training of Staff

4. Induction and Review - For all staff working with children, including locum and agency staff, their induction should include child protection induction as outlined in the Safeguarding Children Board Training Strategy. Where appropriate, supplementary induction, supervision training and appraisal with respect to

3.1 Recruitment, Supervision and Training of Staff

5. Supervision, Principles and Functions, and Support - Senior managers in all agencies for which this manual is relevant have a duty to ensure the provision of: Adequate training; Clear and up to date procedures to follow; Ready access to advice, expertise and management support (including recognition of need for additional support in particul

3.1 Recruitment, Supervision and Training of Staff

7. Equality and Diversity Training - All operational staff must routinely be provided with opportunities for basic and comprehensive anti-discriminatory training. Such training must be rooted in recognition of the diversity of families and communities in Surrey and respect for the differing approaches to child care that this

3.1 Recruitment, Supervision and Training of Staff

3. Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) Checks - The Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 sets out the foundation for the Disclosure and Barring Service. It has an Independent Barring Board (IBB) with responsibility for taking barring decisions on new referrals and the management of two barred lists which replaced List 99, PoCA and PoVA Lists

3.1 Recruitment, Supervision and Training of Staff

6. General Training - All professionals including staff in the private and voluntary sectors, require a general awareness of known indicators and predisposing factors of abuse as well as (role specific) detailed knowledge of agreed policies and procedures. All front line staff must be trained to pass calls abou

3.1 Recruitment, Supervision and Training of Staff

2. Choice of Candidate - Quality of Job Description & Person Specification Agencies should develop detailed internal procedures which clarify allocation of ‘human resource’ tasks outlined below. Job advertisements, application forms, job descriptions and person specifications should reflect professional pr

3.1 Recruitment, Supervision and Training of Staff

1. General Recruitment Process - So as to minimise the risk of employing or engaging an individual who poses a predictable risk to them, all agencies should consider, with respect to candidates who will be working with children (either in a paid or unpaid capacity): Methodically applying techniques which are accepted as h

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

20. Monitoring Progress - The LADO should monitor and record the progress of each case, either fortnightly or monthly depending on its complexity. This could be by way of review strategy/evaluation discussions or direct liaison with the police, Children’s Services, or employer, as appropriate. Where the target ti

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

18. Sharing Information for Disciplinary Purposes - Wherever possible the Police and Children’s Services should, during the course of their investigations and enquiries, obtain consent to provide the employer and/or regulatory body with statements and evidence for disciplinary purposes. If the Police or CPS decide not to charge, or decide

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

21. Outcomes - Unsubstantiated and false allegations Where it is concluded that there is insufficient evidence to substantiate an allegation, the designated senior manager or employer should consider what further action, if any, should be taken, based on the views expressed at the strategy/evaluation mee

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

19. Record Keeping - Employers should keep a clear and comprehensive summary of the case record on the individual’s confidential personnel file and give a copy to the individual. The record should include details of how the allegation was followed up and resolved, the decisions reached and the action taken.

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

24. Procedures in Specific Organisations - It is recognised that many organisations will have their own procedures in place, some of which may need to take into account particular regulations and guidance e.g. schools and registered child care providers. Where organisations do have specific procedures, they should be compatible wit

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

17. Disciplinary Process - Disciplinary or Suitability Process and Investigations The LADO and the designated senior manager should discuss whether disciplinary action is appropriate in all cases where: It is clear at the outset or decided by a Strategy Discussion that a Police investigation or Children’s Services

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

RELEVANT GUIDANCE Risk Assessment for Suspension - Pro Forma; Risk by Association Employee Assessment - Pro Forma; Summary of Child Protection Allegation/Concern to be kept on Personnel File. In addition, see Guidance on Sharing Information Sharing for with Employers, which is accessible v

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

2. The management of allegations - The management of allegations against staff or volunteers who work with children Despite all efforts to recruit safely there will be occasions when allegations of abuse against children are raised. Local Safeguarding Children Boards (LSCBs) should therefore have arrangements in place for m

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

22. Legal duty to refer and power to refer - See the DBS referral guidance and tools The following groups have a power to refer information to the DBS The power to refer may be used when a local authority or regulatory body is acting in a role other that as a regulated activity provider, for example when undertaking a safeguarding ro

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

23. Learning Lessons - At the conclusion of a case in which an allegation is substantiated the employer should review the circumstances of the case to determine whether there are any improvements to be made to the organisation’s procedures or practice to help prevent similar events in the future. This should i

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

6. Support - The setting, together with children’s social care and/or the police, where they are involved, should consider the impact on the child concerned and provide support as appropriate. Liaison between the agencies should take place in order to ensure that the child’s needs are met. As soon

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

7. Suspension - Suspension is a neutral act and it should not be automatic or considered as a default option. It should be considered in any case where: There is cause to suspect a child has suffered, or is likely to suffer Significant Harm; or The allegation warrants investigation by the police; or The a

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

8. Resignations and "Compromise Agreements" - Every effort should be made to reach a conclusion in all cases even if: The individual refuses to cooperate, having been given a full opportunity to answer the allegation and make representations; It may not be possible to apply any disciplinary sanctions if a person’s period of notice e

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

16. Allegations Against Staff in their Personal Lives - If an allegation or concern arises about a member of staff, outside of his/her work with children, and this may present a risk to child(ren) for whom the member of staff is responsible, the general principles outlined in these procedures will still apply. The LADO will ensure: If the risk

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

4. General Considerations Relating to Allegations and Concerns of Abuse - Persons to be Notified The employer must inform the LADO within one working day when an allegation or a concern of suitability is raised and prior to any further investigation taking place There will be consideration as to whether or not to inform the parent/ or carer/s of the child/ren

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

1. Scope - These procedures should be followed by all organisations providing services for children and staff or volunteers who work with or care for children. Compliance with these procedures will help to ensure that allegations of abuse are dealt with expeditiously, consistent with a thorough and f

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

3. Roles and Responsibilities - Each SSCB member organisation should identify a Named Senior Officer with overall responsibility for: Ensuring that the organisation deals with allegations in Accordance with these procedures; Resolving any inter-agency issues; Liaising with the SSCB on the subject. Surrey Children’s Ser

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

9. Organised and Historical Abuse - Investigators should be alert to signs of organised or widespread abuse and/or the involvement of other perpetrators or institutions. They should consider whether the matter should be dealt with in accordance with Complex (Organised or Multiple) Abuse Procedure which, if applicable, will t

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

5. Confidentiality - Every effort should be made to maintain confidentiality and guard against publicity while an allegation is being investigated or considered. Apart from keeping the child, parents and accused person up to date with progress of the case, information should be restricted to those who have a n

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

13. Initial Action by the Designated Senior Manager - When informed of a concern or allegation, the designated senior manager should not investigate the matter or interview the member of staff, child concerned or potential witnesses. They should: Obtain written details of the concern/allegation, signed and dated by the person receiving (not t

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

14. Initial Consideration by the Designated Senior Manager and the Local Authority Designated Person - There are up to 3 strands in the consideration of an allegation: A Police investigation of a possible criminal offence; Children’s Services enquiries and/or assessment about whether a child is in need of protection or services; Consideration by an employer of disciplinary action. The LAD

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

12. Initial Response to an Allegation or Concern - An allegation against a member of staff may arise from a number of sources e.g. a report from a child, a concern raised by another adult in the organisation, or a complaint by a parent or carer. Initial action by person receiving or identifying an allegation or concern The person to whom a

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

15. Strategy Meeting - Wherever possible, a strategy meeting/discussion/initial evaluation meeting should take the form of a meeting, but on occasions a telephone discussion may be justified. The following is a list of possible participants (anyone implicated, or potentially implicated in the allegation should

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

11. Timescales - It is in everyone’s interest for cases to be dealt with expeditiously, fairly and thoroughly and for unnecessary delays to be avoided. The target timescales provided in the flowchart at the end of this chapter are realistic in most cases, but some cases will take longer because of their

3.2 Allegations Against Staff, Carers and Volunteers

10. Whistle-Blowing - All organisations should have in place a whistle-blowing procedure for example as set out in the Raising Concerns at Work: Whistleblowing Guidance for Workers and Employers in Health and Social Care (2014), which is a comprehensive good guidance document for employers and employees. All st

4.10 Implementing the Child Protection Plan (Including the Lead Social Worker and Core Group Responsibilities)

6. The Roles and Responsibilities of Core Group Members - For additional guidance see the SSCB Guidance for Members of Child Protection Core Groups (which can be accessed via the ‘SSCB website’ button on the left hand side of the screen.) Child Protection Plans should be formulated with the specific roles of the Core Group members in mind so

4.10 Implementing the Child Protection Plan (Including the Lead Social Worker and Core Group Responsibilities)

7. Agreement of Detailed Child Protection Plan - Core Group members must agree a plan, which adds detail to the outline Child Protection Plan agreed at the Initial Child Protection Conference. The Core Group should not alter any of the specified outcomes agreed at the conference although they can agree additional outcomes if required. Th

4.10 Implementing the Child Protection Plan (Including the Lead Social Worker and Core Group Responsibilities)

5. The Core Group - Purpose of Core Group The Core Group's task through the Child Protection Plan is to reduce the risks, or prevent the occurrence of further Significant Harm to the child, and safeguard the child's well being to the point that discontinuing the Child Protection Plan can be recommended to the

4.10 Implementing the Child Protection Plan (Including the Lead Social Worker and Core Group Responsibilities)

3. Duties of the Lead Social Worker - Each child with a Child Protection Plan will have a named Lead Social Worker. Once a decision is made that the child requires a Child Protection Plan, one of the primary tasks of the Conference Chair will be to identify the Lead Social Worker. The Lead Social Worker must always be a suitab

4.10 Implementing the Child Protection Plan (Including the Lead Social Worker and Core Group Responsibilities)

2. Explaining the Child Protection Plan to Child and Parents - The child (depending on her/his understanding) and the parents should be clear about the evidence of Significant Harm, which resulted in the child becoming the subject of a Child Protection Plan, what needs to change and what is expected of them as part of the plan for safeguarding and pro

4.10 Implementing the Child Protection Plan (Including the Lead Social Worker and Core Group Responsibilities)

8. The First Core Group Meetings - The Surrey Children's Services' first line manager of the Lead Social Worker will chair the first meeting of the Core Group on the date agreed by the Independent Chair at the Initial Child Protection Conference. This will be within 10 working days of the Conference. Using either the full m

4.10 Implementing the Child Protection Plan (Including the Lead Social Worker and Core Group Responsibilities)

4. The Role of the Lead Social Worker's Manager - The first line manager has a vital role in managing the progress of the case and supporting the Lead Social Worker. The manager must ensure that visits are taking place as required and: Read and countersign all significant recordings and assessments on the child's file, including the incid

4.10 Implementing the Child Protection Plan (Including the Lead Social Worker and Core Group Responsibilities)

11. Delays - Any delays in implementing the Child Protection Plan should be monitored and any appropriate action taken by the Lead Social Worker, their supervisor, and at Core Group meetings.  

4.10 Implementing the Child Protection Plan (Including the Lead Social Worker and Core Group Responsibilities)

Useful resources - The Association of Directors of Children's Services (ADCS) and Cafcass agreement on how local authority social workers and family court guardians should work together during care proceedings and pre-proceedings in the family courts.

4.10 Implementing the Child Protection Plan (Including the Lead Social Worker and Core Group Responsibilities)

12. Failure to Achieve the Desired Outcomes of the Plan - There always has to be the possibility that intervention, monitoring or further assessment will reach the conclusion that the situation is not safe and the child will need to be removed in their interests. In these circumstances, and/or where there is a failure to obtain or retain the coop

4.10 Implementing the Child Protection Plan (Including the Lead Social Worker and Core Group Responsibilities)

1. The Child Protection Plan - If the child has suffered, or is likley to suffer Significant Harm, inter-agency help and intervention must be delivered through a formal Child Protection Plan. The Child Protection Conference which decides that the child should be subject to a Child Protection Plan must: Appoint the lead

4.10 Implementing the Child Protection Plan (Including the Lead Social Worker and Core Group Responsibilities)

9. Subsequent Core Group Meetings - The Core Group should meet sufficiently regularly to facilitate working together, monitor actions and outcomes against the Child Protection Plan, and make any necessary alterations as circumstances change. The second Core Group meeting will usually be held within 6 weeks of the first meeti

4.10 Implementing the Child Protection Plan (Including the Lead Social Worker and Core Group Responsibilities)

10. Recording Core Group Meetings - All Core Group Meetings should be recorded using the agreed format. Copies of the notes and written agreement must be circulated by the Lead Social Worker to all Core Group members, the Lead Social Worker's manager and the Conference Chair within 10 working days of the Core Group Meeting,

4.1 Statutory Framework for Working with Children in Need and their Families

6. Carers and Disabled Children Act 2000 - This Act established additional services that can be provided to the families of disabled children under the Children Act 1989 through use of direct payments and carer break vouchers.  

4.1 Statutory Framework for Working with Children in Need and their Families

7. Carers (Equal Opportunities) Act 2004 - Section 1 means that Local Authorities have a legal duty to inform carers of their right to a carers' assessment. This may be undertaken as part of the Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families provided that information about the carer's own needs are captured alo

4.1 Statutory Framework for Working with Children in Need and their Families

5. Carers (Recognition and Services) Act 1995 - This Act requires an assessment in respect of the needs of a disabled child to include an assessment of her or his carers' ability to provide care to the child, if the carer requests that it should do so. The Act also provides for children who act as carers to persons being assessed under

4.1 Statutory Framework for Working with Children in Need and their Families

4. Disabled Persons (Services, Consultation and Representation) Act 1986 - Section 8 of the Disabled Persons (Services, Consultation and Representation) Act 1986 requires the Local Authority to have regard to the ability of a carer to provide or continue to provide when deciding what services to provide to the disabled person.

4.1 Statutory Framework for Working with Children in Need and their Families

1. Children Act 1989 - The Act gives a broad definition of children in need in Section 17 (10): (S)he is unlikely to achieve or maintain, or to have the opportunity of achieving or maintaining, a reasonable standard of health or development without the provision for him of services by a Local Authority under thi

4.1 Statutory Framework for Working with Children in Need and their Families

2. Children Act 2004 - As a result of amendments made by the Children Act 2004, any assessment of a child (including a young carer) must, amongst other things: Ascertain the child's wishes and feelings regarding the provision of such services as the Local Authority is proposing to make available; and Give due co

4.1 Statutory Framework for Working with Children in Need and their Families

8. The Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families (DoH et al, 2000) - The Assessment Framework provides a systematic multi-agency approach to analyse and record what is happening to a child within their family and the wider context of the community in which they live. The assessment stages involve gathering and analysing information about the three domains o

4.1 Statutory Framework for Working with Children in Need and their Families

3. Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970 - This Act requires a Local Authority to provide services to disabled persons, including children to meet their assessed needs.

4.11 Children on Child Protection Plans who Move Abroad

6. Administration - The Safeguarding Children Unit will administer all Child Protection Review Conferences in the same way as for Initial Child Protection Conferences, including providing Conference Chairs, the sending of invitations (other than to parents and children) and completion of the record of the con

4.11 Children on Child Protection Plans who Move Abroad

7. Outcomes - Every Child Protection Review Conference must consider explicitly whether the child continues to be likley to suffer Significant Harm and therefore continues to need safeguarding through a formal Child Protection Plan. If not, then the child should no longer be the subject of a Child Prote

4.11 Children on Child Protection Plans who Move Abroad

9. Roles and Responsibilities of the Team Manager and Lead Social Worker when the Child Protection Plan Cannot be Implemented - If the Lead Social Worker (or other agencies involved) is unable to implement the Plan, the Lead Social Worker must inform her/his manager. This will include any situation where the Lead Social Worker is denied access to the children concerned, or is unable to carry out the agreed visiting

4.11 Children on Child Protection Plans who Move Abroad

10. Role of the Local Authority Solicitor at Child Protection Conferences - Where it is envisaged that the Surrey Children's Services would be seeking legal action as part of the Child Protection Plan, a meeting must be held involving a solicitor from the Child Care Legal Team, the ATM and the Social Worker before the Child Protection Conference, in order that the

4.11 Children on Child Protection Plans who Move Abroad

5. Attendance - Attendees should include those most involved with the child and family in the same way as at an Initial Child Protection Conference. See Initial Child Protection Conferences Procedure.  

4.11 Children on Child Protection Plans who Move Abroad

8. Recording of Review Conferences - The record of the Review Conference must be prepared, authorised by the Chair and distributed in the same way as for Initial Child Protection Conferences - see Section 23, Record Keeping of Child Protection Conferences of the Initial Child Protection Conferences. The record, signed by the

4.11 Children on Child Protection Plans who Move Abroad

SCOPE OF THIS CHAPTER This chapter should be read in conjunction with Children Missing from Care and Home Procedure. AMENDMENT This chapter replaced the previous version in February 2014 and should be read in its entirety. Local agencies and professionals should bear in mind when working

4.11 Children on Child Protection Plans who Move Abroad

1. Booking a Review Conference - The Safeguarding Children Unit Admin Team will contact the Lead Social Worker via email six weeks before the conference date in order for the Lead Social Worker to duly complete/amend the SCS91 and then return to the Safeguarding Children Unit Admin Team so that they can send out the invit

4.11 Children on Child Protection Plans who Move Abroad

2. Purpose - The purpose of a Child Protection Review Conference is to: Receive the completed assessment from the Core Group at the first review (within 3 months of the Initial Child Protection Conference); Review the safety, health and development of the child against planned outcomes set out in the C

4.11 Children on Child Protection Plans who Move Abroad

4. Reports - The Lead Social Worker must provide to the conference a typed, signed and dated written report including a chronology of significant events, which must be endorsed and counter signed by her/his manager. Information on all children in the household must be provided and the report must be cl

4.11 Children on Child Protection Plans who Move Abroad

3. Frequency - Except in relation to newborn children - see Pre-Birth Child Protection Procedure, the first Child Protection Review Conference must be held within 10 weeks of the date of the Initial Child Protection Conference. Further reviews must be held at intervals of not more than 5 months, for as l

4.12 Child Protection Review Conferences

7. Outcomes - Every Child Protection Review Conference must consider explicitly whether the child continues to be likley to suffer Significant Harm and therefore continues to need safeguarding through a formal Child Protection Plan. If not, then the child should no longer be the subject of a Child Prote

4.12 Child Protection Review Conferences

8. Recording of Review Conferences - The record of the Review Conference must be prepared, authorised by the Chair and distributed in the same way as for Initial Child Protection Conferences - see Section 23, Record Keeping of Child Protection Conferences of the Initial Child Protection Conferences. The record, signed by the

4.12 Child Protection Review Conferences

5. Attendance - Attendees should include those most involved with the child and family in the same way as at an Initial Child Protection Conference. See Initial Child Protection Conferences Procedure.

4.12 Child Protection Review Conferences

9. Roles and Responsibilities of the Team Manager and Lead Social Worker when the Child Protection Plan Cannot be Implemented - If the Lead Social Worker (or other agencies involved) is unable to implement the Plan, the Lead Social Worker must inform her/his manager. This will include any situation where the Lead Social Worker is denied access to the children concerned, or is unable to carry out the agreed visiting

4.12 Child Protection Review Conferences

1. Booking a Review Conference - The Safeguarding Children Unit Admin Team will contact the Lead Social Worker via email six weeks before the conference date in order for the Lead Social Worker to duly complete/amend the SCS91 and then return to the Safeguarding Children Unit Admin Team so that they can send out the invit

4.12 Child Protection Review Conferences

10. Role of the Local Authority Solicitor at Child Protection Conferences - Where it is envisaged that the Surrey Children's Services would be seeking legal action as part of the Child Protection Plan, a meeting must be held involving a solicitor from the Child Care Legal Team, the ATM and the Social Worker before the Child Protection Conference, in order that the

4.12 Child Protection Review Conferences

2. Purpose - The purpose of a Child Protection Review Conference is to: Receive the completed assessment from the Core Group at the first review (within 3 months of the Initial Child Protection Conference); Review the safety, health and development of the child against planned outcomes set out in the C

4.12 Child Protection Review Conferences

3. Frequency - Except in relation to newborn children - see Pre-Birth Child Protection Procedure, the first Child Protection Review Conference must be held within 10 weeks of the date of the Initial Child Protection Conference. Further reviews must be held at intervals of not more than 5 months, for as l

4.12 Child Protection Review Conferences

4. Reports - The Lead Social Worker must provide to the conference a typed, signed and dated written report including a chronology of significant events, which must be endorsed and counter signed by her/his manager. Information on all children in the household must be provided and the report must be cl

4.12 Child Protection Review Conferences

6. Administration - The Safeguarding Children Unit will administer all Child Protection Review Conferences in the same way as for Initial Child Protection Conferences, including providing Conference Chairs, the sending of invitations (other than to parents and children) and completion of the record of the con

4.13 Safeguarding Disabled Children

For detailed guidance, see Safeguarding Disabled Children: Practice Guidance (DCSF 2009)   Introduction   Discrimination of all kinds is an everyday reality in many disabled children’s and young people’s lives and such prejudice damages them both physically and emotionally. It is t

4.14 Use of Interpreters, Signers and Others with Communication Skills

NOTE All agencies need to ensure they are able to communicate fully with parents and children when they have concerns and ensure that family members and professionals fully understand the exchanges that take place.

4.14 Use of Interpreters, Signers and Others with Communication Skills

2. Interviewing Children - The particular needs of a child who is thought to have communication problems should be considered at an early point in the planning of the Section 47 Enquiry (the Strategy Meeting stage). Professionals should be aware that interviewing is possible when a child communicates by means other

4.14 Use of Interpreters, Signers and Others with Communication Skills

3. Using Interpreters With Family Members - If the family’s first language is not English and even if they appear reasonably fluent, the offer of an interpreter should be made, as it is essential that all issues are understood and fully explained. Interpreters used for child protection work should have been subject to references a

4.14 Use of Interpreters, Signers and Others with Communication Skills

1. Recognition of Communication Difficulties - The use of accredited interpreters, signers or others with special communication skills must be considered whenever undertaking enquiries involving one or more of the following: Children and/or family members for whom English is not the first language (even if reasonably fluent in English,

4.15 Achieving Best Evidence: Interviews of Children

3. Conduct of Joint Video Interviews - In all cases where it is agreed to conduct a video recorded interview of a child, "Achieving best evidence: Guidance on interviewing victims and witnesses, and guidance on using spacial measures(3RD Edition)" must be followed and staff conducting the interview must have had appropriate

4.15 Achieving Best Evidence: Interviews of Children

1. Criteria for Video Interviews - See "Achieving best evidence: Guidance on interviewing victims and witnesses, and guidance on using spacial measures(3RD Edition)" for full and detailed Guidance. Given the variety of children's backgrounds and the different circumstances leading to suspicion of abuse there are no hard a

4.15 Achieving Best Evidence: Interviews of Children

2. Purpose - Any video recorded interview serves two primary purposes: Evidence gathering for use in criminal proceedings; and Evidence in chief of the child witness. In addition any relevant information gained during the interview can be used to Inform enquiries under Section 47 and any subsequent act

4.15 Achieving Best Evidence: Interviews of Children

4. Child's Consent to the Video Recording of an Interview - The video recording of interviews of children may only be carried out with the consent of the child her/himself. The interviewers are responsible for ensuring that, as far as possible, the child is freely participating in the interview, and not merely complying with a request from adult au

4.2 Surrey Early Help and Multi-Agency Levels of Need

This chapter was updated in October 2016 as a new Levels of Need document replaced the previous version. Surrey’s Levels of Need for children and young people and families are underpinned by a shared definition of early help: “Early help means providing support as soon as a problem em

4.3 Recognition of Significant Harm

6. Risk Indicators - The factors described in this section are frequently found in cases of child abuse. Their presence is not proof that abuse has occurred, but: Must be regarded as indicators of the possibility of Significant Harm; Justifies the need for careful assessment and discussion with Designated Prof

4.3 Recognition of Significant Harm

5. Neglect - Neglect is a form of Significant Harm which involves the persistent failure to meet a child's basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child's health or development. Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abu

4.3 Recognition of Significant Harm

2. Physical Abuse - Physical Abuse is a form of Significant Harm which may involve including hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or d

4.3 Recognition of Significant Harm

4. Sexual Abuse and Exploitation - Sexual abuse and exploitation is a form of Significant Harm which involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve p

4.3 Recognition of Significant Harm

3. Emotional Abuse - Emotional abuse is a form of Significant Harm which involves the persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and persistent adverse effects on the child's emotional development. It may involve conveying to children that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or

4.3 Recognition of Significant Harm

AMENDMENT In May 2016, this chapter was updated to include information regarding child sexual abuse and the exploitation of children and young people. 

4.3 Recognition of Significant Harm

1. Definition of Significant Harm - The Children Act 1989 introduced the concept of Significant Harm as the threshold that justifies compulsory intervention in family life in the best interests of children. There are no absolute criteria on which to rely when judging what constitutes Significant Harm but consideration should

4.4 Parental Responsibility

2. Who has Parental Responsibility? - Where a child's father and mother were married to each other at the time of her/his birth, they shall each have Parental Responsibility for the child. When a child's father and mother were not married to each other at the time of her/his birth: The mother has Parental Responsibility for th

4.4 Parental Responsibility

1. Definition - The Children Act 1989 defines Parental Responsibility as all the rights, duties, powers, responsibilities and authority which by law, a parent of a child has, in relation to the child and her/his property. The Act provides consistent rules about the acquisition and exercise of Parental Res

4.4 Parental Responsibility

SCOPE OF THIS CHAPTER This chapter was reviewed and revised for the May 2011 edition of the manual.

4.5 Contacts and Referrals

5. Parental Consultation - A decision by any professional not to seek parental permission before making a referral to Surrey Children's Services must be recorded and the reasons given. If the parent is consulted and refuses to give permission for the referral, further advice should be sought from a manager or Design

4.5 Contacts and Referrals

6. Listening to the Child - If the child makes an allegation or discloses information which raises concern about Significant Harm, the initial response should be listening carefully to what the child says so as to: Clarify the concerns; Offer reassurance about how (s)he will be kept safe; and Explain that the informa

4.5 Contacts and Referrals

4. Making a Referral - Referrals by professionals should be made in one of the following ways: For multi-agency partners urgent referrals via a telephone call and followed up in writing using the Multi Agency Referral Form; In person or by telephone contact with Surrey Children’s Service sIn an emergency outsi

4.5 Contacts and Referrals

3. Confidentiality - The safety and welfare of the child overrides all other considerations, including the following: Confidentiality; Gathering of evidence; Commitment or loyalty to relatives, friends or colleagues. In deciding whether there is a need to share information, professionals need to consider their

4.5 Contacts and Referrals

1. Duty to Refer - Staff in any agency must make a referral to Surrey Children's Services if it is believed or suspected that: A child is suffering or is likely to suffer Significant Harm; or A child's health or development may be impaired without the provision of services; or With the agreement of the perso

4.5 Contacts and Referrals

2. Ensuring the Immediate Safety of the Child - The safety of children is paramount in all decisions relating to their welfare. Any action taken by members of staff from a Surrey Safeguarding Children Board member agency must ensure that no child is left in immediate danger. When considering whether immediate action is required to prote

4.5 Contacts and Referrals

7. Cross Boundary Referrals - If the referral relates to a child whose home is in Surrey, but who is temporarily visiting or placed in the area of another Local Authority or in a hospital in the area of another authority, or if the referral relates to an allegation against an adult who works in Surrey but lives in the

4.6 Assessment

5. Contribution of Agencies Involved with the Child and Family - All agencies and professionals involved with the child, and the family, have a responsibility to contribute to the assessment process. This might take the form of providing information in a timely manner and direct or joint work. Differences of opinion between professionals should be resol

4.6 Assessment

6. Actions and Outcomes - Every assessment should be focused on outcomes, deciding which services and support to provide to deliver improved welfare for the child and reflect the child’s best interests. In the course of the assessment the social worker and their line manager should determine: Is this a Child in N

4.6 Assessment

7. Regular Review - The assessment plan must set out timescales for the actions to be met and stages of the assessment to progress, which should include regular points to review the assessment. The work with the child and family should ensure that the agreed points are achieved through regular reviews. Where

4.6 Assessment

1. Focus on the Child - Children should to be seen and listened to and included throughout the assessment process. Their ways of communicating should be understood in the context of their family and community as well as their behaviour and developmental stage. Assessments, service provision and decision making sh

4.6 Assessment

9. Principles for a Good Assessment - The assessment triangle in Working Together to Safeguard Children 2015 provides a model, which should be used to examine how the different aspects of the child’s life and context interact and impact on the child. It notes that it is important that: Information is gathered and recorded sy

4.6 Assessment

2. Planning - All assessments should be planned and coordinated by a social worker and the purpose of the assessment should be transparent, understood and agreed by all participants. There should be an agreed statement setting out the aims of the assessment process. Planning should identify the differen

4.6 Assessment

3. Developing a Clear Analysis - Research has demonstrated that taking a systematic approach to assessments using a conceptual model is the best way to deliver a comprehensive analysis. A good assessment is one which investigates the three domains; set out in the Assessment Framework Triangle. The interaction of these do

4.6 Assessment

SCOPE OF THIS CHAPTER All Local authorities with their partner agencies must develop and publish local frameworks for assessment, which must be based on good analysis, timeliness and transparency and be proportionate to the needs of the child and their family. Each child who has been refer

4.6 Assessment

8. Recording - Recording by all professionals should include information on the child's development so that progress can be monitored to ensure their outcomes are improving. This is particularly significant in circumstances where neglect is an issue. Records should be kept of the progress of the assessm

4.6 Assessment

4. Contribution of the Child and Family - The Child The child should participate and contribute directly to the assessment process based upon their age, understanding and identity. They should be seen alone and if this is not possible or in their best interest, the reason should be recorded. The social worker should work directly

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

2. Timescales of Strategy Discussion/Meeting - Strategy Discussions / Meetings should be held within a maximum of 3 working days of the referral of the incident of concern for a child known to Surrey Children's Services, or decision by a multi-agency network that the Family Action Plan is not meeting the child's needs except in the fol

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

3. When a Face-to-Face Meeting is required - A Strategy Discussion may take place at a meeting or by other means (for example, by telephone). In complex types of maltreatment a meeting is likely to be the most effective way of discussing the child's welfare and planning future action. Face-to-face meetings must be held when there: Is

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

4. Recording of a Strategy Discussion/Meeting - Agreed actions, the persons responsible and the agreed time scale must be recorded. It is the responsibility of the Chair of the Strategy Meeting to write the Strategy minutes in the meeting using the Record of Strategy Discussion and including both information and actions. The minutes sh

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

13. Parental Involvement and Consent - Parental Involvement The Social Worker has the prime responsibility to engage with parents and other family members to ascertain the facts of the situation causing concern and to assess the capacity of the family to safeguard the child. The SSCB leaflet Child Protection Enquiries: Informa

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

14. Medical Assessments - When a Medical Assessment is Necessary Strategy Discussions or Meetings must consider, in consultation with the Named Doctor/ Paediatrician (if not part of the Strategy Discussion or Meeting), the need for and timing of a medical assessment. Medical assessments should always be considered

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

8. Surrey Children's Services - Single Agency Enquiry - Following a strategy meeting/discussion a decision will be made as to whether there is going to be a single or joint agency enquiry. This may involve any of the following referrals: Purely Emotional Abuse without any apparent physical indicators; Physical Abuse resulting in minimal or no

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

15. Outcome of the Section 47 Enquiries - Section 47 Enquiries are concluded at the point when an informed decision is made taking account of all information available as to whether the child has suffered, or is likely to suffer Significant Harm or not. When a joint investigation has been held, a Strategy Discussion or Meeting sho

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

12. Inability to Access the Child - If efforts to see and communicate with the child or children within the time scales agreed at the Strategy Discussion are unsuccessful, then the Social Worker and, where relevant, the Police officer should: Inform the relevant manger, and seek legal advice as appropriate; In consultation w

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

5. Duty and Decision to Undertake Section 47 Enquiries - Surrey Children's Services has a statutory duty to undertake Section 47 Enquiries in any of the following circumstances: When for a child who lives or is found in its area, there is 'reasonable cause to suspect that a child has suffered or is likely to suffer Significant Harm'; When a chil

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

AMENDMENT This chapter was updated in March 2015 with a link to the SSCB leaflet for families in Sections 11, Seeing and Interviewing the Child and 13, Parental Involvement and Consent.

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

6. Integration with an Assessment - An Assessment is the means by which Section 47 Enquiries are carried out and must be commenced whenever the criteria for Section 47 Enquiries are satisfied. The Assessment must be completed within 45 working days from the point of referral. Section 47 Enquiries should begin by focusing pri

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

7. Single Agency or Joint Enquiry/Investigation - See also the Section 47 Protocol between Surrey Children's Services and Surrey Police (which can be accessed by clicking on the 'guidance and protocols' button in the menu at the left hand side of the screen.

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

9. Police Single Agency Investigations - Police single agency investigations are usually appropriate when: They relate to the historical allegation of an adult who experienced abuse as a child; or The alleged offender is not known to the child or the child's family (i.e. stranger abuse); in these situations, Surrey Children's Ser

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

1. Strategy Discussions and Meetings - Whenever there is reasonable cause to suspect that a child is suffering, or is likely to sufferSignificant Harm, there should be a Strategy Discussion/Meeting involving Surrey Children's Services and the Police, Health (Named Nurse and/or Named Doctor) and other bodies as appropriate (for

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

10. Joint Investigation - Joint investigations are conducted by Surrey Children's Services and the Police. A joint investigation must always commence when there is an allegation or reasonable suspicion that one of the criminal offences described below has been committed: Any suspected sexual offence committed again

4.7 Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries

11. Seeing and Interviewing the Child - Children who are the subject of Section 47 Enquiries should always be seen and communicated with alone by the Lead Social Worker. In addition all children within the household must be directly communicated with during Section 47 Enquiries by either the Police or Surrey Children's Services

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

4. Who Should Attend - See also Section 6, Enabling Parental Participation and Section 12, Enabling Children's Participation The conference should consist of the smallest number of people consistent with effective case management, but the following should normally be invited: Parents and those with Parental Resp

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

6. Enabling Parental Participation - All parents and persons with Parental Responsibility must be invited to conferences (unless exclusion is justified as described below). Parents must be encouraged to contribute to conferences; usually by attending, unless it is likely to prejudice the welfare of the child (see Section 11,

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

3. Timing of Initial Child Protection Conferences - The Initial Child Protection Conference must take place within 15 working days of the: Strategy Discussion/Meeting (or the Strategy Discussion/ Meeting at which the Section 47 Enquiry was initiated if more than one was held) following completion of Section 47 enquiries; or Notification by

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

1. Purpose of Initial Child Protection Conference - The Initial Child Protection Conference brings together family members, the child (when appropriate), supporters / advocates and those professionals most involved with the child and family to share and assess information following a Section 47 Enquiry and to formulate an agreed plan of man

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

AMENDMENT Links were added in Section 6, Enabling Parental Participation and Section 12, Enabling Children's Participation to the SSCB information  leaflets for children and young people and for families. March 2015.

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

2. When an Initial Child Protection Conference must be convened - An Initial Child Protection Conference must be convened when it is believed that a child is suffering or likely to suffer Significant Harm. Children may be abused through the infliction of harm or through the failure to act to prevent harm. The conference must consider all the children in

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

5. Quorate Conferences - The primary principle for determining quoracy is that there should be sufficient agencies present to enable safe decisions to be made in the individual circumstances. Normally, minimum representation is the Social Worker and 2 other agencies which have had direct contact with the child and

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

19. Categories of Abuse or Neglect - If the decision is that the child has suffered, or is likely to suffer Significant Harm and in need of a Child Protection Plan, the Chair must determine under which category of abuse or neglect the decision is made. For the categories, see Deciding and Recording that a Child should be Subj

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

7. Pre-birth Conferences - See also Pre-Birth Child Protection Procedure A pre-birth conference is an Initial Child Protection Conference concerning an unborn child. Such a conference has the same status and purpose and must be conducted in a comparable manner to an Initial Child Protection Conference. Pre-birth con

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

17. Responsibilities of the Conference Chair - The Conference Chair must not have any operational or line management responsibility for the case. The Conference Chair must ensure that at least 3 agencies are represented at the conference unless agreed otherwise (see Section 5, Quorate Conferences) The Conference Chair is responsible fo

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

20. If a Child Requires a Child Protection Plan - If a decision is reached that a child requires a Child Protection Plan, the Conference Chair must ensure that: Criteria for Child Protection Plans are satisfied and the category is determined; A Child Protection Plan is outlined and clearly understood by all concerned including the parents

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

21. Quality Assurance - The Conference Chair has responsibility for ensuring consistently high standards of practice by encouraging inter-agency co-operation and identifying shortcomings in practice. In order to achieve this, the Conference Chair must: Ensure that relevant data is collected for quality monitoring

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

24. Decision Letter - The Chair must forward a letter to the parents and child(ren) confirming the decisions and recommendations of the Conference. The decision letter must be dispatched to parents / carers and other participants within 2 working days of the conference. This gives details of whether the child(r

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

23. Record Keeping of Child Protection Conferences - The record of the Conference is a crucial working document for all relevant professionals and the family. The record produced is not a verbatim minute but is a summary of the main facts and issues, which are raised and addressed at the conference. All reports presented at conference will b

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

22. Complaints and Representations - Each consultant constituent agency of the Surrey Safeguarding Children Board operates and publicises its own complaints procedures, which includes an independent element. Complaints and representation specific to one professional are therefore to be addressed to the particular agency invo

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

16. Responsibilities of Other Professionals - General Responsibilities All participants are responsible for the following: To make available relevant information to the conference; Confirming in advance with the Safeguarding Unit their attendance at the conference or informing the Unit if they are unable to attend; Ensuring that infor

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

18. The Decision Making Process - The questions to ask as part of the decision making process are: Has the child suffered Significant Harm? and Is the child likely to suffer Significant Harm? The test for the likelihood of the child suffering Significant Harm in the future should be: The child can be shown to have suffered

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

15. Reports to Conference (ICSF) - The Social Worker must provide to the conference a typed, signed and dated written Initial Child Protection Conference report (SCS125) including a chronology of significant events, which must be endorsed and counter signed by the Team Manager. Information on all children in the household m

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

10. Role of the Conference Chair before Conference - Immediately prior to the conference, the Conference Chair must meet with any family members to ensure they understand the process. This may, where the potential for conflict exists, involve separate meetings with the different parties.  

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

9. Role of All Agencies - Treat all family members with dignity and respect and offer a caring and courteous service; Ensure family members know the child's safety and welfare has priority; Minimise infringement of privacy consistent with protecting the child; Be clear about powers and purpose of any intervention;

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

8. Role of the Social Worker - The Social Worker must facilitate the constructive involvement of the parents by ensuring in advance of the conference that they are given sufficient information and practical support to make a meaningful contribution. Invitations for the parent(s) to attend the conference must be conveyed

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

12. Enabling Children's Participation - Involving the Child The child must be kept informed and involved throughout Section 47 Enquiries and, if their level of understanding is sufficient, must be invited to contribute to the conference; which can include attendance. In practice, the appropriateness of enabling an individual chi

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

11. Criteria for Excluding Parents or Restricting their Participation - In circumstances where it may be necessary to exclude 1 or more family members from part or all of a conference the request to exclude or restrict a parent's participation must be discussed with the Conference Chair and confirmed in writing if possible at least 3 days in advance. The agenc

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

13. Support for the Child After the Conference - The supporter or In-house Advocacy Service should ensure that immediately after the conference the child has an opportunity to discuss their experiences of the meeting and feelings about the decision and recommendations made. If the supporter has concerns about the child these must be disc

4.8 Initial Child Protection Conferences

14. Responsibilities of the Social Worker before the Conference - General Responsibilities The Social Worker is responsible for the following: Considering as described in Section 6, Enabling Parental Participation and Section 12, Enabling Children's Participation the participation of parents and children in the conference; Inviting the child if appropria

4.9 Deciding and Recording that a Child Should be Subject to a Child Protection Plan

12. Children Subject to a Child Protection Plan who become Looked After - The Lead Social Worker must inform the Safeguarding Children Unit of the change in circumstances and address. The Safeguarding Children Unit must inform the professional network by letter. The Safeguarding Children Unit must supply minutes of child protection conferences to the allocatedIn

4.9 Deciding and Recording that a Child Should be Subject to a Child Protection Plan

13. Case Responsibility within Surrey Children's Services - Children not made subject to a Child Protection Plan Case responsibility must be transferred to the relevant Locality Team in the following circumstances: When both the Section 47 Enquiry and an Assessment concludes that the child is a Child in Need; If the child is subject of an Initial C

4.9 Deciding and Recording that a Child Should be Subject to a Child Protection Plan

3. Process of Deciding a Child Should be Subject of a Child Protection Plan - A child will become the subject of a Child Protection Plan after a decision to do so has been taken at a Child Protection Conference and the Conference Chair has determined the category of abuse or neglect (see Section 5, Categories of Abuse or Neglect). The decision-making process must ta

4.9 Deciding and Recording that a Child Should be Subject to a Child Protection Plan

10. What Happens After the Child Protection Conference, including the Review Process? - Click here to view What Happens after the Child Protection Conference, Including the Review Process? Flowchart in Working Together to Safeguard Children 2015

4.9 Deciding and Recording that a Child Should be Subject to a Child Protection Plan

11. Looked After Children with a Child Protection Plan - In relation to Looked After children, decisions regarding the continued need for a Child Protection Plan must be made alongside consideration of the Care Plan. The Care Plan will be the primary means of safeguarding the safety and welfare of the child. A Child Protection Plan should only b

4.9 Deciding and Recording that a Child Should be Subject to a Child Protection Plan

9. Discontinuing the Child Protection Plan - A child should no longer be subject to a Child Protection Plan if: It is judged that (s)he is no longer likley to suffer Significant Harm requiring safeguarding by means of a Child Protection Plan - under these circumstances, only a Child Protection Review Conference can decide that a Chil

4.9 Deciding and Recording that a Child Should be Subject to a Child Protection Plan

4. Is the Child at Continuing Risk of Significant Harm? - Before a child is made the subject of a Child Protection Plan, the Child Protection Conference must decide that the child is at continuing risk of Significant Harm leading to the need for a Child Protection Plan. The conference must consider the following questions: Has the child suffered

4.9 Deciding and Recording that a Child Should be Subject to a Child Protection Plan

1. Introduction - The Manager of the Safeguarding Children Unit is responsible for holding the Record of children subject of Child Protection Plans.

4.9 Deciding and Recording that a Child Should be Subject to a Child Protection Plan

8. Enquiries about Children who may be Subject to Child Protection Plans - Enquiries about children who may be subject to Child Protection Plans should only be made if there concerns about a child's welfare. In such circumstances, formal enquiries should only be made by contacting the Safeguarding Children Unit. Enquiries for agencies are also carried out by the

4.9 Deciding and Recording that a Child Should be Subject to a Child Protection Plan

5. Categories of Abuse or Neglect - The categories are: Neglect: This definition is now contained in the Working Together to Safeguard Children 2015 Glossary:Neglect is a form of Significant Harm which involves the persistent failure to meet a child's basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious

4.9 Deciding and Recording that a Child Should be Subject to a Child Protection Plan

2. Purpose of Recording Child Protection Plans - A decision to make a child the subject of a Child Protection Plan is an agreed expression of multi-disciplinary concern about a child. The purposes of recording the decision are to: Provide detailed readily available information about children who are known or suspected to have suffered Si

4.9 Deciding and Recording that a Child Should be Subject to a Child Protection Plan

6. The Outline Child Protection Plan - When a Conference decides that a child should be the subject of a Child Protection Plan, it must also draw up an outline Child Protection Plan. The Chair must ensure that the Child Protection Plan drawn up by conference members: Identifies factors associated with the likelihood of the chil

4.9 Deciding and Recording that a Child Should be Subject to a Child Protection Plan

7. Informing Parents and Children - Unless there are exceptional reasons, parents must always be informed when their child is subject to a Child Protection Plan. Children must be informed too, depending on level of understanding. The Child Protection Plan must take account of the views of the child and the parents. The Chair

5.10 Domestic Abuse

3. Referrals by Other Professionals - All professionals are reminded of the guidance in Working Together 2015 (Paragraph 18, Page 9) which states:  Any professionals with concerns about a child’s welfare should make a referral to local authority children’s social care. Professionals should follow up their concerns if they

5.10 Domestic Abuse

4. Response to Notifications and Referrals - On notification of an incident of domestic abuse within a family, the minimum response by Surrey Children’s Services must be to consult existing records and consider what else is known of the family. For referrals and notifications of any serious incidents of domestic abuse where there i

5.10 Domestic Abuse

6. Domestic Violence Protection Orders - Domestic Violence Protection Orders (DVPOs) were implemented across England and Wales from 8 March 2014. They provide protection to victims by enabling the police and magistrates to put in place protection in the immediate aftermath of a domestic violence incident. With DVPOs, a perpetrato

5.10 Domestic Abuse

5.The Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme - The Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme (DVDS) gives members of the public a formal mechanism to make enquires about an individual who they are in a relationship with, or who is in a relationship with someone they know, where there is a concern that the individual may be violent towards th

5.10 Domestic Abuse

RELEVANT GUIDANCE See also the SSCB Guidance ‘Safeguarding children and young people affected by domestic abuse’ which can be accessed via the ‘SSCB website’ button on the left hand side of the screen. Additionally see NICE Guidance - Domestic Violence and Abuse: How Health Servi

5.10 Domestic Abuse

2. Notifications by the Police - The Police are often the first point of contact and they should safeguard the safety of the victim and: Ascertain whether there are any children living in the household or if the victim is pregnant; Make a preliminary determination of the degree of exposure of the children to the incidents

5.10 Domestic Abuse

1. Introduction - Significant Harm resulting from domestic abuse may manifest itself in a variety of ways including physical violence, emotional or psychological abuse, sexual violence and abuse, financial control and abuse and the imposition of social isolation or movement deprivation. The definition of

5.10 Domestic Abuse

7. Serious Crime Act 2015 - Coercive and Controlling Behaviour - A new criminal offence of coercive and controlling behaviour came into force in England and Wales on 29 December 2015. Why the new law? There was a gap in the law which meant that repeated patterns of non-physical behaviour were not recognised in a criminal law context as domestic abuse.

5.1 The Internet and the Abuse of Children

3. Referral and Strategy Discussion - Where there is suspected or actual evidence of anyone accessing or creating indecent images of children, this must be referred to the Police and Surrey Children's Services under the Contacts and Referrals Procedure. Where there are concerns about a child being groomed, exposed to child abu

5.1 The Internet and the Abuse of Children

1. The Internet - As technology develops, the Internet and its range of content services can be accessed through various devices including mobile phones, text messaging and mobile camera phones as well as computers and game consoles. As a consequence the Internet has become a significant tool in the distrib

5.1 The Internet and the Abuse of Children

2. Child Abuse and the Adult - There is some evidence that people found in possession of indecent photographs/pseudo photographs or films/videos of children are likely to be involved directly in child abuse themselves. When someone is discovered to have placed or accessed such material on the Internet, the Police should

5.11 Practice guidance: Working with Hostile, Non-Compliant Clients who use Disguised Compliance within the Context of Safeguarding Children

10. Supervision - Managers must consider the following matters: Routine, regular supervision; Review of previous reports; Peer mentoring; and Group supervision.

5.11 Practice guidance: Working with Hostile, Non-Compliant Clients who use Disguised Compliance within the Context of Safeguarding Children

3. Guidance - First Principles - Workers have a right to feel safe, to be heard when they voice fears and concerns and to know that the response should include appropriate action being taken. Workers in Surrey serve a diverse population with differing needs. Practice needs to be inclusive to reflect these differences. Wor

5.11 Practice guidance: Working with Hostile, Non-Compliant Clients who use Disguised Compliance within the Context of Safeguarding Children

1. Introduction - The nature of child protection work is such that parents and carers may at times feel angry and react in a hostile or threatening way towards workers who are involved with them and their families. Employers have responsibilities under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, Health and Safe

5.11 Practice guidance: Working with Hostile, Non-Compliant Clients who use Disguised Compliance within the Context of Safeguarding Children

7. Clients using Disguised Compliance - Workers may believe they have engaged in a positive way with parents/carers in addressing risk and working towards change however this may not be the case. As a consequence the following may happen: Cases can drift; Risks are not reduced; Risks may actually be increased; and Workers may fa

5.11 Practice guidance: Working with Hostile, Non-Compliant Clients who use Disguised Compliance within the Context of Safeguarding Children

8. Hostile and Threatening Clients - Ask yourself: Did I feel safe in this household? If not, why not? If I or another professional should go back there to ensure the child(ren)’s safety, what support should I ask for? If necessary, put your concerns and requests in writing to your manager. (Assessing Risk in Child Protecti

5.11 Practice guidance: Working with Hostile, Non-Compliant Clients who use Disguised Compliance within the Context of Safeguarding Children

9. Case Management - The following areas are essential for good case management: Procedures Workers must always follow their agency procedures and the procedures contained in this manual, which have incorporated the Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families. Inter-agency Communication

5.11 Practice guidance: Working with Hostile, Non-Compliant Clients who use Disguised Compliance within the Context of Safeguarding Children

5. Recognition of Potential Hostility and Non Compliance - Ask yourself: What were the reasons for the parents’ behaviour? Are there other possibilities besides the obvious? Could their behaviour have been a reaction to something I did or said rather than to do with the child?” Ask yourself: Have the parents understood the situation and do the

5.11 Practice guidance: Working with Hostile, Non-Compliant Clients who use Disguised Compliance within the Context of Safeguarding Children

6. Recognition of Disguised Compliance - Factors, which may indicate and evidence, disguised compliance: No significant change at reviews despite significant input; Parents/carers agreeing with professionals regarding required changes but put little effort into making changes work; Change does occur but as a result of external ag

5.11 Practice guidance: Working with Hostile, Non-Compliant Clients who use Disguised Compliance within the Context of Safeguarding Children

4. Definitions - For the purpose of this guidance the following broad definitions are being used: Hostile and threatening behaviour; behaviour which produces damaging effects, physically or emotionally, in other people; Non-compliant behaviour; involves proactively sabotaging efforts to bring about change

5.11 Practice guidance: Working with Hostile, Non-Compliant Clients who use Disguised Compliance within the Context of Safeguarding Children

2. Purpose of this Guidance - To assist staff and their managers working with hostile/threatening and non-compliant parents/carers and those who use disguised compliance. To help workers and their managers identify where these actions may be impacting on the care of the child/children and possible child protection issu

5.12 Fabricated or Induced Illness

3. Recognition - Doctors/paediatricians may be concerned at the possibility of a child suffering Significant Harm as a result of having illness fabricated or induced by their carer. These concerns may arise when: Reported symptoms and signs found on examination are not explained by any medical condition fr

5.12 Fabricated or Induced Illness

2. Definition - A condition whereby a child suffers harm through the deliberate action of her/his main carer and which is attributed by the adult to another cause. There are three main ways of the carer fabricating or inducing illness in a child: Fabrication of signs and symptoms, including fabrication of

5.12 Fabricated or Induced Illness

1. Introduction - Fabricated or Induced Illness is a rare, potentially lethal form of abuse. It has previously been referred to as Fabricated illness by proxy; Factitious illness by proxy; Munchausen Syndrome by proxy; Illness Induction Syndrome. In order to keep the child's safety and welfare as the primar

5.12 Fabricated or Induced Illness

4. Response - Concerns about a child’s health should be discussed with a health professional who is involved with the child such as the school nurse, GP or paediatrician. If any professional considers their concerns are not taken seriously or responded to appropriately, these should be discussed with

5.12 Fabricated or Induced Illness

10. Outcome of Section 47 Enquiries - As with all Section 47 Enquiries, the outcome may be that concerns are not substantiated - e.g. tests may identify a medical condition, which explains the signs and symptoms. It may be that no protective action is required, but the family should be provided with the opportunity to discuss

5.12 Fabricated or Induced Illness

12. Pre-birth Child Protection Conference - Evidence of illness having been fabricated in an older sibling or another child should be carefully considered during the pregnancy of a woman who is known to have abused a child in this way. A pregnant woman may have a history of fabricating illness in herself during a previous pregnancy.

5.12 Fabricated or Induced Illness

Appendix - Template for Warning Signs of Fabricated or Induced Illness - Note: ‘Symptoms’ are subjective experiences reported by the carer or the patient. ‘Signs’ are observable events reported by the carer or observed or elicited by professionals. We set out below some examples of behaviour to look out for. Category Warning signs of Fabricated or Induc

5.12 Fabricated or Induced Illness

5. Medical Evaluation - At no time should concerns about the reasons for the child’s signs and symptoms be shared with parents if this information would jeopardise the child’s safety and compromise any Section 47 Enquiry and or criminal investigation. The signs and symptoms require careful medical evaluation

5.12 Fabricated or Induced Illness

RELEVANT GUIDANCE See also the SSCB Guidance on Fabricated or Induced Illness, which can be accessed via the ‘SSCB website’ button in the menu on the left hand side of the page. AMENDMENT This chapter was reviewed and revised for the October 2011 edition of the manual.

5.12 Fabricated or Induced Illness

9. Strategy Meeting - If there is reasonable cause to suspect the child is suffering, or likely to suffer significant harm, Surrey Children's Services should convene and chair a Strategy Meeting involving all the key professionals. The Strategy Meeting requires the involvement of key senior professionals respon

5.12 Fabricated or Induced Illness

11. Initial Child Protection Conference - See also Initial Child Protection Conference Procedure The Initial Child Protection Conference should be held within 15 working days from the last Strategy Meeting. Attendance at this conference should be as for other Initial Child Protection Conferences, with the additional experts invite

5.12 Fabricated or Induced Illness

6. Referral - When a possible explanation for the signs and symptoms is that they may have been fabricated or induced by a carer and as a consequence the child’s health or development is or is likely to be impaired, a referral should be made to the Surrey Children's Services in accordance with theCont

5.12 Fabricated or Induced Illness

7. Initial Consideration of Referral - As with all other referrals, Surrey Children's Services should decide within one working day what response is necessary. Whilst Surrey Children's Services has lead responsibility for action to safeguard and promote the child’s welfare, the decision should be taken in consultation with th

5.12 Fabricated or Induced Illness

8. Assessment, Outcomes and Immediate Protection - The decision on the outcome should be made in consultation with the Paediatric Consultant and the police, with agreement reached regarding what the parents should be told. ‘Concerns should not be raised with a parent if it is judged that this action will jeopardise the child’s safety.

5.13 Female Genital Mutilation

RELATED GUIDANCE This procedure should be read in conjunction with HM Government ‘Multi-agency statutory guidance on female genital multilation’ published on 1st April 2016 . This multi-agency guidance on female genital mutilation (FGM) should be read and followed by all persons and bo

5.14 Forced Marriage

4. Immediate Response - Situations where a child fears being forced into marriage have similarities with both domestic violence and honour based violence. Professionals should respond in a similar way to forced marriage as with domestic violence and honour based violence: In facilitating disclosure; Developing in

5.14 Forced Marriage

5. Referral to Surrey Children's Services - If a professional and/or their agency's nominated safeguarding children adviser conclude that the child is at risk of harm, the professional should make a referral to Surrey Children's Services in line with the Contacts and Referrals Procedure. If the situation is acute, the professional s

5.14 Forced Marriage

3. Recognition - A child who is being forced into marriage is at risk of Significant Harm through physical, sexual and emotional abuse. See Recognition of Significant Harm Procedure. Significant Harm is defined as a situation where a child is suffering, or is likely to suffer, a degree of physical, sexual

5.14 Forced Marriage

6. Considerations for all Agencies - Forced marriage places children and vulnerable adults at risk of rape and possible physical harm, including murder. Where an allegation of forced marriage, intended forced marriage or honour-based violence is raised, the Forced Marriage Unit at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office should be

5.14 Forced Marriage

1. Introduction - Further information and guidelines concerning work with situations of forced marriage is available in the following government publications: The Right to Choose - Multi Agency Statutory Guidance for Dealing with Forced Marriage, 2008 Multi Agency Practice Guidelines: Handling Cases of Forc

5.14 Forced Marriage

2. Definition - Forced' marriage, as distinct from a consensual 'arranged' one, is a marriage conducted without the valid consent of both parties and where duress is a factor. Duress cannot be justified on religious or cultural grounds. Duress can include physical, psychological, financial, sexual and emo

5.14 Forced Marriage

AMENDMENT This chapter was updated in October 2015 to provide a link to Forced Marriage Protection Orders.

5.15 Honour Based Violence

3. Disclosure and Response - When receiving a disclosure from a child, professionals should recognise the seriousness / immediacy of the risk of harm. For a child to report to any agency that they have fears of honour based violence in respect of themselves or a family member requires a lot of courage, and trust that

5.15 Honour Based Violence

1. Introduction - Honour based violence is a collection of practices, which are used to control behaviour and exert power within families to protect perceived cultural and religious beliefs and/or honour. Such violence can occur when perpetrators perceive that an individual has shamed the family and/or comm

5.15 Honour Based Violence

2. Recognition - A child who is at risk of honour based violence is at significant risk of physical harm (including being murdered) and/or neglect, and may also suffer significant emotional harm through the threat of violence or witnessing violence directed towards a sibling or other family member. See Rec

5.16 Historical Abuse Allegations

2. Response - As soon as it is apparent that an adult is revealing childhood abuse, the practitioner involved must record what is said by the adult and the responses given by the practitioner must be recorded as well. If possible, the practitioner should establish, if the adult is aware of the alleged p

5.16 Historical Abuse Allegations

3. Allegations Against Adults Who Worked with Children - If the adult is disclosing abuse against an individual who worked with children, a referral must be made to the Local Authority Designated Officer known as the LADO. The LADO will initially: Undertake checks to establish if the alleged perpetrator is currently working with children; Check

5.16 Historical Abuse Allegations

AMENDMENT This chapter was reviewed for the October 2015 edition of the manual.

5.16 Historical Abuse Allegations

1. Significance - All SSCB agencies and their partner agencies responses to allegations by an adult of abuse experienced as a child must be of as high standard as a response to allegations of current abuse because: There is a significant likelihood that a person, who abused a child in the past, will have co

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

10. Independent Return Interview - When a child who has been missing is found or returns, they will be offered an Independent Return Interview in order to understand and prevent the child going missing and to try to uncover information to prevent the risk recurring and reduce exposure to risk while missing.  The Multi Agen

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

9. When a Child Missing from Home or Care is Located or Returns - 9.1 It is important to not just return the child to a safe environment and discover what happened to them whilst they were missing, but to ascertain the reason for their leaving in the first place. This may not always be apparent nor may the child immediately disclose the actual reason. It

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

13. Triage Panel / MAECC (Missing and Exploited Children Conference) - Area Triage Panel meetings have representation from Surrey Children’s Services, Police, Education, Health and Youth Support Services. The groups meet weekly to discuss all incoming CSE risk assessments and manages Low and some Medium risk CSE, Missing and Perpetrator cases.  Monthly Are

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

12. Assessments following a Missing Episode - All missing episodes will be considered and assessed in the MASH. The outcome of this assessment may be an offer of Early Help, a Child & Family Assessment, a strategy meeting or immediate safeguarding action.  All children will be offered a Return Home Interview (see above).  If a c

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

14. Support for Families - When a child is missing it is important that parents/carers are offered support both during the episode and once the child has returned. For details of independent agencies that can help, see Appendix 2  

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

8. Publicity / Media Strategy - The Police and local authority have joint responsibility for advising the media regarding missing children and decisions will be based on a number of factors including the level of risk, relevant information, and the period of time the child has been missing. These decisions will be jointl

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

7. Children who are Looked After and go Missing (Including Care Leavers) - For staff in Surrey Children’s Services, see also detailed internal procedures on the Children’s Procedures site. The expectations in terms of support and intervention apply equally to Surrey children placed out of county albeit elements of the required activity may be carried out by s

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

4. Roles and Responsibilities - 4.1 Local Authority Local authorities must ensure that all incidents where children go missing are appropriately risk assessed, and should consider whether any missing episodes indicate needs requiring a new or different offer of help.  The local authority should record all incidents of l

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

5. Specific Risks - 5.1 Child Sexual Exploitation The sexual exploitation of children involves exploitative situations, contexts and relationships where the young person (or third person/s) receive 'something' (e.g. food, accommodation, drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, affection, gifts, money) as a result of them

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

3. Definitions - DEFINITION OF A MISSING PERSON ‘Anyone whose whereabouts cannot be established and where the circumstances are out of character or the context suggests the person may be subject of crime or at risk of harm to themselves or another’.  DEFINITION OF ABSENT ‘A person not at a place whe

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

2. Scope - This joint procedure applies to: All children under 18 who go missing from their parents/carers/home;  Children "Looked After" by Surrey Council placed within the authority’s boundaries; Children "Looked After" by other local authorities, but placed within Surrey boundaries; Children wh

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

1. Introduction and Context - The following protocol and procedure has been created to provide a multi-agency response to children who are missing or have been missing from home and care. Going missing is a potentially dangerous activity and a child who goes missing just once faces the same immediate risks as those who

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

15. Monitoring of Missing Children Data - Data regarding missing children is collated monthly from Police and Surrey Children’s Service information and is reported to Surrey Police and Children’s Services. This data is also compiled in quarterly reports which are shared with Surrey Police and Children’s Services, the Surrey

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

11. Responding to Information from Safe and Well Checks and Return Home Interviews - Information gathered from Police Safe and Well checks, Return Home Interviews and any other discussions with parents/carers, should be jointly considered with the Police (and other agencies as appropriate) and an appropriate plan put in place for the child.  Consideration should also be g

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

6. Children Missing from Home - 6.1 Responsibility of the Alerter: Parents/Carers, Agencies and Voluntary Sector If a child is thought to be missing or not where they are supposed to be, immediate efforts should be made to try and locate him/her. Parents, carers or a responsible adult involved with the child are expected

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

Appendix 5: Partner Agency Contact Details - Surrey Multi-agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH): 0300 470 9100 Surrey Police Missing Persons Unit: 01483 639674 Surrey Emergency Duty Team: 01483 517898 Surrey Youth Services: 01372 363655 Surrey Children's Services: 0300 200 1006

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

AMENDMENT This chapter has been updated throughout in October 2016 in line with national guidance.  

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

Appendix 4: Information needed when Reporting a Missing Person - The following information must be available when reporting a child or young person as missing or absent in order for the Police to make an accurate assessment of the risk, and locate the individual. Personal details of the individual (e.g. Name, DOB, Sex, Nationality); Relationship of call

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

Appendix 3: Missing Children Risk Assessment Record - Click here to see the Missing Children Risk Assessment Record.

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

Appendix 1: Glossary - Accommodated: A child is accommodated if the Local Authority looks after them with the voluntary agreement of his / her parents or with the child if s/he is over 16 years old.   Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children: There are complex issues facing Asylum Seeking children. Information ab

5.17 Children Missing from Care and Home

Appendix 2: Helplines - Missing People The charity is there 24/7 to offer support to those who have run away, gone missing or been forced to leave. They are there to help talk things through, give confidential advice and pass a message home if a child / young person wishes for this.   The charity can also provid

5.18 Children Missing from Education

Further Information - This guidance should be read in the context of the statutory duties upon local authorities and parents as set out in the following: The Education Act 1996; The Education Act 2002; The Children Act 1989; The Children Act 2004; Statutory guidance for local authorities: Children missing

5.18 Children Missing from Education

3. Notifications and Actions - Day one If the answers to any of the points set out in the previous section indicates that there are concerns about the child’s safety then a referral should be made to the police and children’s social care on day one. The education welfare service should be informed and requested to a

5.18 Children Missing from Education

1. Definition of Children Missing Education - For the purpose of the Statutory Guidance on Children Missing Education (2015), children missing education are defined as those who are not on a school roll or receiving suitable education otherwise than at school. Those who are regularly absent or have missed 10 school days or more withou

5.18 Children Missing from Education

2. Recognition and Response - Enquiries into the circumstances surrounding a child who is missing from school can be effectively supported by schools adopting an admissions procedure which requires a parent/carer to provide documentary evidence of their own and the child’s identity and status in the UK, and the addre

5.18 Children Missing from Education

This chapter was added to the manual in October 2015.

5.19 Pre-birth Child Protection Procedure

1. Introduction - UK Law does not legislate for the rights of the unborn baby. In some circumstances, agencies or individuals are able to anticipate the likelihood of Significant Harm with regard to an expected baby. Although it is recognised that in the ante-natal period a number of professionals have resp

5.19 Pre-birth Child Protection Procedure

4. Pre-birth Multi-Agency Strategy Meeting - The meeting should take place on agreed strategy meeting days within each of Surrey quadrants. The meeting should be chaired by a Children's Social Care Services Team Manager or Assistant Team Manager and involve: Lead Safeguarding Midwife; Police; Social worker; Named nurse and named midw

5.19 Pre-birth Child Protection Procedure

7. Pre-Birth Conferences - A pre-birth conference is an Initial Child Protection Conference concerning an unborn child. Such a conference has the same status and proceeds in the same way as other Initial Child Protection Conferences, including decisions about the Child Protection Plan, and must be conducted in a com

5.19 Pre-birth Child Protection Procedure

AMENDMENT This chapter was reviewed and revised for the March 2015 edition of the manual.

5.19 Pre-birth Child Protection Procedure

Appendices - Appendix 1: Pre-Birth Assessment and Intervention Timeline Appendix 2: Hospital Birth Plan 

5.19 Pre-birth Child Protection Procedure

2. Recognition and Referral - Where agencies or individuals anticipate that prospective parents may need support services to care for their baby agencies need to consider whether an Early Help Assessment is needed in the first instance (see Surrey Multi-Agency Levels of Need). When an expectant mother is age 16-18 an

5.19 Pre-birth Child Protection Procedure

6. If it is Suspected that a Baby May be Born at Home - The Local Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and Children's Social Care Services have a duty to contact any relevant agencies if they have concern about an unborn child. If it is suspected that a child may be born at home or delivered prior to arriving at the hospital a referral should be

5.19 Pre-birth Child Protection Procedure

3. Response - All pre-birth Referrals to Children's Social Care Services, which met the threshold for referral must be subject to Child and Family Assessment (see Assessment Procedure) and a multi agency Strategy Discussion/Meeting must be held in the circumstances outlined in Section 2, Recognition and

5.19 Pre-birth Child Protection Procedure

5. Pre-birth Section 47 Enquiry and Assessment - See Guidance in relation to completing pre-birth Assessments (accessible via the ‘guidance and protocols’ button in the menu on the left hand side of the screen.) In undertaking a pre-birth Section 47 Enquiry and Assessment the Children's Social Care Services, the Police and relevant o

5.20 Trafficked and Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children

2. Assessment - Surrey Children's Services should carry out an Assessment regardless of the child's immigration status. Where there are concerns about trafficking during the assessment consideration should be given to actioning a Strategy discussion/ meeting, see Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquir

5.20 Trafficked and Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children

1. Introduction - Unaccompanied children: Professionals in all agencies should be aware that refugee and asylum seeking and unaccompanied children, are vulnerable. The children and many of their carers will need assistance to ensure that the child receives adequate care and accesses health and education ser

5.20 Trafficked and Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children

3. Age Assessment and Information Sharing - The issue of age assessment in social work with asylum seeking young people remains controversial and has been something that Children’s social care have struggled with since the millennium. The ADCS Asylum Task Force has worked with the Home Office to provide two new jointly agreed docu

5.20 Trafficked and Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children

RELEVANT GUIDANCE Care of unaccompanied and trafficked children: Statutory guidance for local authorities on the care of unaccompanied asylum seeking and trafficked children (July 2014) 'Safeguarding children who may have been trafficked', non-statutory good practice guidance issued by the

5.2 Begging

An adult begging for money may have a child with them who may or may not be their own, and whose role is to invoke public sympathy. A child may also beg alone or appear to be so doing. It is not the activity itself, rather the consequent risks which determine if an Assessment with aSectio

5.20 Trafficked and Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children

5. Contact Information - Contact information can be obtained via the Foreign and Commonwealth Office or the relevant Embassy or Consulate. The referral forms and guidance to the National Referral Mechanism see Human Trafficking Victims Referral and Assessment Forms (Government website) Additional information about

5.20 Trafficked and Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children

4. Trafficked Children - A  child at risk of being trafficked who is provided with care and accommodation must, where possible, be placed within the county in accommodation that provides the level of supervision proportionate to the need to protect them. This may include protection from possible abduction by an u

5.21 Racial and Religious Harassment

This chapter is currently under review. Children and families from black or ethnic minority groups are likely to have experienced or are still experiencing harassment, racial discrimination and institutional racism. Experience of racism is likely to affect how a child behaves, in particu

5.22 Families where a Parent has a Learning Difficulty

Where a parent(s) with a learning difficulty appears not to be able to meet her/his child's needs, a referral should be made to Surrey Children's Services, which has a responsibility to assess need and where justified, offer supportive or protective services - see the Contacts and Referral

5.23 Parental Substance Misuse

This chapter should be read in conjunction with Best Practice Guidance When Parents Are Using Drugs/Alcohol: Working Together with Parents and Children. Misuse of drugs and/or alcohol is strongly associated with significant harm to children, especially when combined with other features suc

5.24 Enduring and/or Severe Parental Mental Illness

RELATED GUIDANCE ‘Mental Health Crisis Care Concordat’ February 2014; This document outlines new developments for services to people of all ages in relation to acute mental health problems. Children and Young People’s Health outcomes forum July 2012 AMENDMENT This chapter was update

5.25 Young Carers

A young carer is a young person under the age of eighteen who has a responsibility for caring on a regular basis for a relative (or very occasionally a friend) who has an illness or disability. This can be primary or secondary caring and leads to a variety of losses for the young carer. Ma

5.26 Self-Harm and Suicidal Behaviour

3. Risks - An assessment of risk should be undertaken at the earliest stage and should enquire about and consider the child or young person’s: Level of planning and intent; Frequency of thoughts and actions; Signs or symptoms of a mental health disorder such as depression; Evidence or disclosure of

5.26 Self-Harm and Suicidal Behaviour

1. Definition - Definitions from the Mental Health Foundation (2003) are: Deliberate self-harm is self-harm without suicidal intent, resulting in non-fatal injury; Attempted suicide is self-harm with intent to take life, resulting in non-fatal injury; Suicide is self-harm, resulting in death. The term sel

5.26 Self-Harm and Suicidal Behaviour

2. Indicators - The indicators that a child or young person may be at risk of taking actions to harm themselves or attempt suicide can cover a wide range of life events such as bereavement, bullying at school or a variety of forms of cyber bullying, often via mobile phones, homophobic bullying, mental hea

5.26 Self-Harm and Suicidal Behaviour

5. Issues – Information Sharing and Consent - The best assessment of the child or young person’s needs and the risks, they may be exposed to, requires useful information to be gathered in order to analyse and plan the support services. In order to share and access information from the relevant professionals the child or young person

5.26 Self-Harm and Suicidal Behaviour

4. Protective and Supportive Action - A supportive response demonstrating respect and understanding of the child or young person, along with a non-judgmental stance, are of prime importance. Note also that a child or young person who has a learning disability may find it more difficult to express their thoughts. Practitioners

5.26 Self-Harm and Suicidal Behaviour

SCOPE OF THIS CHAPTER Any child or young person, who self-harms or expresses thoughts about this or about suicide, must be taken seriously and appropriate help and intervention should be offered at the earliest point. Any practitioner, who is made aware that a child or young person has sel

5.27 Pregnancy of a Child

RELATED CHAPTER Pre-birth Child Protection Procedure All professionals, particularly health and education staff who have most contact with pregnant teenagers, have a responsibility to consider the welfare of both the prospective mother and her baby. Any assessment of need should address

5.28 Foreign Exchange Visits

1. Context This guidance should be applied to all situations where students (18 and under) are being accommodated with host families while registered at an educational establishment in Surrey whether the placement is short term or long term. Children and young people on foreign exchange v

5.29 Surrogacy

If hospital staff become aware that a baby who is about to be born, or has just been born is the product of commissioning and have grounds to doubt the commissioners identity / suitability to care for the baby, or the degree of voluntarism (payment beyond reasonable expenses is unlawful),

5.3 A Multi-agency Protocol for the Management of Actual or Suspected bruising in Infants who are Not Independently Mobile

AIM OF PROTOCOL The aim of this protocol is to provide all professionals with a knowledge base and action strategy for the assessment, management and referral of infants who are Not Independently Mobile (NIM) who present with bruising. All practitioners should refer to the Procedures for S

5.3 A Multi-agency Protocol for the Management of Actual or Suspected bruising in Infants who are Not Independently Mobile

2. Research Base - There is a substantial and well-founded research base on the significance of bruising in children. See the Core Info website and also a national repository of Serious Case Reviews at NSPCC serious-case-reviews which provides a national picture of concerns. While accidental and innocent bru

5.3 A Multi-agency Protocol for the Management of Actual or Suspected bruising in Infants who are Not Independently Mobile

1. Definitions - For the Purpose of this Protocol Not Independently Mobile (NIM): is an infant who is not yet crawling, bottom shuffling, or cruising. It includes all infants under 6 months. Bruising is defined as: Extravasations of blood in the soft tissues, producing a temporary, non- blanching discolour

5.3 A Multi-agency Protocol for the Management of Actual or Suspected bruising in Infants who are Not Independently Mobile

3. Scope of Protocol - This protocol relates only to bruising in infants who are Not Independently Mobile. It includes allinfants under 6 months. It should be noted that infants may be abused (including sustaining fractures, serious head injuries and intra-abdominal injuries) with no evidence of bruising or exte

5.3 A Multi-agency Protocol for the Management of Actual or Suspected bruising in Infants who are Not Independently Mobile

4. Action to be taken by Individuals and Agencies on Identifying Actual or Suspected Bruising - Referring Practitioner responsibilities: If the infant appears seriously ill or injured: Seek emergency treatment at an Emergency Department (ED); Notify Children’s Services / Police of your concerns and the child’s location. A transfer to hospital should not be delayed by a referral t

5.30 Children and Blood Borne Viruses

Blood-borne viruses (e.g. HIV, hepatitis B and C) are not in themselves issues for child protection, and there is no evidence that child protection issues arise disproportionately in families affected by these viruses. Workers should seek specialist advice if issues about blood-borne virus

5.3 A Multi-agency Protocol for the Management of Actual or Suspected bruising in Infants who are Not Independently Mobile

Appendices - Appendix 1: Body Maps Appendix 2: Contact Details Appendix 3: Multi-agency Flowchart for the Management of Actual or Suspected Bruising in Infants who are not Independently Mobile  

5.3 A Multi-agency Protocol for the Management of Actual or Suspected bruising in Infants who are Not Independently Mobile

6. Sharing Information and Consulting Colleagues - Please refer to Managing Individual Cases section of these procedures. If there are concerns about the decision making and management of the case, any professional has a duty to escalate concerns to the next level in line the SSCB Escalation policy.

5.3 A Multi-agency Protocol for the Management of Actual or Suspected bruising in Infants who are Not Independently Mobile

5. Specific Circumstances - Birth Injury: In the case of new-born infants where bruising may be the result of birth trauma, instrumental delivery, or medical procedures such as blood tests, professionals should remain alert to the possibility of physical abuse even in a hospital setting. In this situation profession

5.31 Supporting Children and Young People Vulnerable to Violent Extremism

1. Introduction - Radicalisation is defined as the process by which people come to support terrorism and violent extremism and, in some cases, to then participate in terrorist groups. There is no obvious profile of a person likely to become involved in extremism or a single indicator of when a person might

5.31 Supporting Children and Young People Vulnerable to Violent Extremism

SCOPE OF THIS CHAPTER This chapter is based on and summarises the document 'Prevent and Safeguarding Guidance: Supporting Individuals Vulnerable to Violent Extremism', which has been issued by the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO). The guidance provides advice on how to manage an

5.31 Supporting Children and Young People Vulnerable to Violent Extremism

2. National Guidance and Strategies - The following are part of the government's counter terrorist strategy, referred to as CONTEST. The Prevent Strategy: A Guide for Local Partners in England. Stopping people becoming or supporting terrorists and violent extremists The expectation is that within all local authority areas a Pr

5.31 Supporting Children and Young People Vulnerable to Violent Extremism

3. Referral and Intervention Processes - The ACPO guidance provides a model referral process for children and young people who are vulnerable to radicalisation and/or who may be at risk through living with or being in direct contact with known extremists. Click here to view model referral process flowchart. Staff working with chi

5.31 Supporting Children and Young People Vulnerable to Violent Extremism

4. Understanding and Recognising Risks and Vulnerabilities of Radicalisation - Children and young people can be drawn into violence or they can be exposed to the messages of extremist groups by many means. These can include through the influence of family members or friends and/or direct contact with extremist groups and organisations or, increasingly, through the in

5.32 Self-Taken Indecent Images

Click here to view the ACPO CPAI Lead’s Position on Young People Who Post Self-Taken Indecent Images.

5.33 Spirit Possession or Witchcraft

AMENDMENT A section of Further information with links was added in September 2014.

5.33 Spirit Possession or Witchcraft

4. Professional Response - Faith based abuse may challenge a professional's own faith and / or belief, or the professional may have little or no knowledge on the issues that may arise. This makes it difficult for the professional to identify what they might be dealing with and affect their judgement. It will often t

5.33 Spirit Possession or Witchcraft

1. Introduction - Current guidelines for praying for children and engaging with them in a faith context are available in the 'Safe and Secure' booklet, available at: www.ccpas.co.uk, produced by the Churches' Child Protection Advisory Service (CCPAS) and the Metropolitan Police. Whilst the booklet is specif

5.33 Spirit Possession or Witchcraft

2. Reasons for the Abuse - A belief in spirit possession is not confined to particular countries, cultures, religions or communities. Common factors that put a child at risk of harm include: Belief in evil spirits: this is commonly accompanied by a belief that the child could 'infect' others with such 'evil'. The ex

5.33 Spirit Possession or Witchcraft

3. Recognising Child Abuse or Neglect Linked to Spirit Possession - Indicators of abuse include: A child's body showing signs or marks, such as bruises or burns, from physical abuse; A child becoming noticeably confused, withdrawn, disorientated or isolated and appearing alone amongst other children; A child's personal care deteriorating, for example throu

5.33 Spirit Possession or Witchcraft

5. Working with Places of Worship and Faith Organisations - In some circumstances, it may be appropriate to work in partnership with a responsible leader/s from a faith community or to assist a community in terms of safeguarding children through education and training. Such training provides preventative and parenting opportunities. Before embarkin

5.33 Spirit Possession or Witchcraft

6. Children being taken out of the UK - If a professional is concerned that a child who is being abused or neglected is being taken out of the country, it is relevant to consider: Why the child is being taken out of the UK; Whether the care arrangements for the child in the UK allow the local authority to discharge its safeguard

5.34 Online Safety

4. Protection and Action to be Taken - Where there is suspected or actual evidence of anyone accessing or creating indecent images of children, this must be referred to the Police and Children’s social care in line with the Contacts and Referrals Procedure. Where there are concerns about a child being groomed, exposed to chil

5.34 Online Safety

2. Risks - There is some evidence from research that people found in possession of indecent images/pseudo images or films/videos of children may currently, or in the future become, involved directly in childAbuse themselves. In particular, the individual’s access to children should be established

5.34 Online Safety

This chapter was added to the manual in October 2015.

5.34 Online Safety

3. Indicators - Often issues involving child abuse come to light through an accidental discovery of images on a computer or other device and can seem to emerge ‘out of the blue’ from an otherwise trusted and non-suspicious individual. This in itself can make accepting the fact of the abuse difficult f

5.34 Online Safety

1. Definition - ‘Internet Abuse’ relates to four main areas of abuse to children: Abusive images of children (although these are not confined to the Internet); A child or young person being groomed for the purpose of Sexual Abuse; Exposure to adult abusive images and other offensive material via the I

5.34 Online Safety

5. Issues - When communicating via the internet, young people tend to become less wary and talk about things far more openly than they might when communicating face to face. Both male and female adults and some young people may use the internet to harm children. Some do this by looking at, taking and/

5.34 Online Safety

7. Further Information - See UK Safer Internet website and CEOP, thinkUknow website. Childnet Advice on Sexting Behaviour that is illegal if committed offline is also illegal if committed online. It is recommended that legal advice is sought in the event of an online issue or situation. There are a number of p

5.4 Children and Families in Need Moving Across Safeguarding Children Board Boundaries

10. A Child (With or Without Carers) Arriving in Surrey from Outside the UK - The following procedures apply to all children moving into Surrey from outside the U.K., whether unaccompanied, with their family / relatives or with other adults (see also Trafficked and Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children Procedure). Responsibility for Recognition of Child in Need All

5.4 Children and Families in Need Moving Across Safeguarding Children Board Boundaries

AMENDMENT Some terminology was updated in September 2014 in regards to Early Help Assessments.

5.4 Children and Families in Need Moving Across Safeguarding Children Board Boundaries

8. Child Subject to a Child Protection Plan in the Originating Authority - Responsibility If housing provision is assessed as being required for a family with a child subject to a Child Protection Plan, all efforts should be made for the provision to be within the originating authority unless a move is part of the Child Protection Plan. This applies to both tempo

5.4 Children and Families in Need Moving Across Safeguarding Children Board Boundaries

7. Child Accommodated by the Originating Authority - Responsibility An Accommodated child remains the responsibility of the originating authority until: (S)he is discharged from accommodation; or Agreement is reached, and confirmed in writing by its first line manager, that the receiving authority will accommodate the child(ren). Responsibil

5.4 Children and Families in Need Moving Across Safeguarding Children Board Boundaries

9. A Child (not Subject to a Child Protection Plan or Looked After) in Receipt of Services from the Originating Authority - Attribution of Responsibility Where a child and/or family in receipt of Children’s Services move to another authority, it is the responsibility of the originating authority to notify the receiving authority in writing of their circumstances. In response to notification by the originating

5.4 Children and Families in Need Moving Across Safeguarding Children Board Boundaries

1. Definitions - The increasing numbers of families moving or being moved across boundaries presents difficulties in terms of safe, reliable and consistent delivery of services. The universal services offered by health and education are delivered to a child in the area where (s)he is living. Arrangements f

5.4 Children and Families in Need Moving Across Safeguarding Children Board Boundaries

4. Inter-Authority Arrangements for Section 47 Enquiries - A local authority has a legal duty under Section 47 of the Children Act 1989 to conduct enquiries regarding suspected or actual Significant Harm to a child who lives, or is found in its area. The term ‘home authority’ refers to the authority holding case responsibility, or if the child

5.4 Children and Families in Need Moving Across Safeguarding Children Board Boundaries

5. Case Responsibility Following Move - Responsibility for the provision of Surrey Children's Services normally rests with the authority in which the child is living or found, regardless of whether the residence is regarded as temporary or permanent by either professionals or family. Specific qualifications and exceptions apply

5.4 Children and Families in Need Moving Across Safeguarding Children Board Boundaries

3. Best Practice for Information Sharing - Particular care must be exercised by all agencies in contact with children and families moving across borough/county boundaries to collect accurate information on any child in need and share this with other agencies e.g.: Ensuring that all fore names and surnames used by the family are pro

5.4 Children and Families in Need Moving Across Safeguarding Children Board Boundaries

2. Indicators of Risk - When families move frequently, it is more difficult for agencies to identify risks and monitor a child’s welfare. All agencies, which come into contact with families who have moved, must ensure that they establish basic information regarding previous address(es), registration with a doct

5.4 Children and Families in Need Moving Across Safeguarding Children Board Boundaries

6. Child Subject to Statutory Order in the Originating Authority - ase Responsibility Children subject to a statutory order remain the responsibility of the originating authority until the order is discharged, or expires, unless transferred to the receiving authority. The receiving authority may, (and this must be confirmed in writing by first line manage

5.5 Safeguarding Children and Young People from Sexual Exploitation

7. Roles and Responsibilities - 7.1 Surrey Safeguarding Children Board Surrey Safeguarding Children Board (SSCB) has a key role to play in coordinating and ensuring the effectiveness of responses to CSE in Surrey. The DfE[1] has set out clear guidance on what effective local responses look like. These have been reflected

5.5 Safeguarding Children and Young People from Sexual Exploitation

6. Multi Agency Involvement - The complex nature of CSE requires a joined-up, multi-agency response. All staff (including practitioners, middle and senior managers) in all agencies should, as a result of training, at minimum have a basic understanding of CSE, be familiar with vulnerability factors and warning signs/ris

5.5 Safeguarding Children and Young People from Sexual Exploitation

4. Key Principles - In 2017, partners in Surrey adopted the ‘Safer Surrey’ approach – a strength-based approach that works on the premise that children and their families have the strengths, resources and ability to recover from adversities. It creates a common language used by all professionals across

5.5 Safeguarding Children and Young People from Sexual Exploitation

1. Introduction - Reducing the impact of Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) is a priority for Surrey Safeguarding Children Board and its partners This guidance outlines the roles and responsibilities of relevant agencies and the procedures practitioners should follow to ensure the safety and well-being of chil

5.5 Safeguarding Children and Young People from Sexual Exploitation

AMENDMENT This chapter was updated in July 2017 to reflect changes to existing procedures.

5.5 Safeguarding Children and Young People from Sexual Exploitation

5. Responding to CSE - Please see here for the CSE Operating Process  Identification CSE is often a hidden harm, and explicit evidence of exploitation may not be evident. Children and young people may not disclose their experiences. This can be out of fear of recriminations, feelings of shame and guilt or becau

5.5 Safeguarding Children and Young People from Sexual Exploitation

2. What is CSE - Surrey Safeguarding Children Board and its partners have adopted the following definition of CSE published by the Department for Education in April 2017: Child sexual exploitation is a form of child sexual abuse. It occurs where an individual or group takes advantage of an imbalance of po

5.5 Safeguarding Children and Young People from Sexual Exploitation

3. Aims and Purposes - The procedures outlined here provide a framework for responding to CSE in Surrey with the aim of ensuring Surrey children are protected from CSE and feel safe in their communities. The purpose of these procedures is to: Support the early identification of children at risk of/experiencing C

5.6 Children Displaying Harmful Sexual Behaviour

1. Introduction - While sexual exploration and experimentation are a normal part of childhood development, there are circumstances in which children are sexually harmed by other children and the consequences for the victim can be just as serious as when the abuser is an adult. The primary objective of all w

5.6 Children Displaying Harmful Sexual Behaviour

Appendix 1: Sexually Harmful Behaviour following Police Report of Incident - Flowchart - Click here to view flowchart 

5.6 Children Displaying Harmful Sexual Behaviour

Appendix 2: Definition of an AIM 2 Assessment - The Assessment, Intervention, Moving On - Version2 (AIM2) Model of Assessment (Print et al. 2006) The AIM2 assessment is an actuarial measure developed within the UK. It is made up of a number of evidence-based risk and protective factors associated with young people who do or do not go on

5.6 Children Displaying Harmful Sexual Behaviour

AMENDMENT This chapter was updated in May 2016 and includes information on the Surrey Sexual Assault Referral Centre (SARC). 

5.6 Children Displaying Harmful Sexual Behaviour

6. Outcomes of Section 47 Enquiries - The outcome of Section 47 Enquiries is as described in the Strategy Discussions and Section 47 Enquiries Procedure. However, the position of the alleged victim and the child who is suspected or alleged to have sexually abused should be considered separately. If the information gathered in

5.6 Children Displaying Harmful Sexual Behaviour

5. Procedure - See also Appendix 1: Sexually Harmful Behaviour following Police Report of Incident - Flowchart. Strategy Discussion/Meeting In all cases where the suspected or alleged abuser is a child, the Police and Surrey Children's Services must convene a Strategy Discussion or, more often, a Strateg

5.6 Children Displaying Harmful Sexual Behaviour

3. Recognition - When there is suspicion or an allegation of a child having been sexually abusive to another child, it should be referred immediately to the Surrey Children's Services or the Police Public Safeguarding Investigation Unit (SIU) in accordance with the Contacts and Referrals Procedure. It shou

5.6 Children Displaying Harmful Sexual Behaviour

4. Factors to Consider when Investigating a Child who has (Allegedly) Displayed Harmful Sexual Behaviour - In order to more fully determine the nature of the incident, the presence of exploitation in terms of equality, consent and coercion should be given consideration: Equality Consider differentials of physical, cognitive and emotional development, power, control, status and authority, passiv

5.6 Children Displaying Harmful Sexual Behaviour

2. Definition - The boundary between what is abusive and what is part of normal childhood or youthful experimentation can be blurred. Professionals’ ability to determine whether a child’s sexual behaviour is developmental, inappropriate or abusive will hinge around the related concepts of true consent

5.7 Complex (Organised or Multiple) Abuse

RELATED READING This should be read in conjunction with the Home Office and Department of Health 2002 Guidance "Complex Child Abuse Investigations: Inter Agency Issues". This chapter was added to the manual in May 2016. LOCAL INFORMATION Complex (Organised or Multiple) Abuse Flowchart

5.7 Complex (Organised or Multiple) Abuse

7. Strategic Management Group - To ensure a coordinated response, a SMG (Strategic Management Group) meeting chaired by the Assistant Chief Police Officer must be convened within 5 working days of the Complex Abuse Strategy Meeting which agreed that these procedures should be adopted. The membership of the SMG should com

5.7 Complex (Organised or Multiple) Abuse

8. The Joint Investigation Management Group - In cases of exceptional complexity and scale, an Investigation Management Group (IMG) will be appointed. Membership This group led by the PPIU senior investigating officer or the Surrey Children's Services Area Manager, should consist of experienced personnel from PPIU and Surrey Children'

5.7 Complex (Organised or Multiple) Abuse

9. Crossing Geographical and Operational Boundaries - It may be recognised at the outset or during the investigation that there are suspected or potential victims in more than one geographical area. At the outset, the responsibility for managing the investigation lies with the Surrey Children's Services Assessment Team where the abuse is alle

5.7 Complex (Organised or Multiple) Abuse

10. End of Enquiry/Investigation Meeting and Report - At the conclusion of the enquiry/investigation, the Strategic Management Group will evaluate the investigation, identify the lessons learned and prepare an overview report for the Surrey Safeguarding Children Board, highlighting any practices, procedures or policies which may need further

5.7 Complex (Organised or Multiple) Abuse

6. Informing Senior Managers - If having considered the information available, the conclusion of this meeting is that the suspicions are confirmed, the Area Team Manager will inform the Head of the Safeguarding Children Unit and the Head of Surrey Children's Services. The DI will inform the Head of Police Public Protect

5.7 Complex (Organised or Multiple) Abuse

5. Complex Abuse Strategy Meeting - All allegations, which may suggest the response under these procedures, should involve the Area Manager, Surrey Children's Services chairing the Strategy Meeting. These meetings are known as Complex Abuse Strategy Meetings. The following people should be invited to the first Complex Abuse

5.7 Complex (Organised or Multiple) Abuse

1. Definition - Organised or multiple abuse covers circumstances which may involve a number of abusers and/or a number of children. The abusers concerned may be acting together to abuse a child or children. One or more of the adults involved may be using an institutional framework or position of authority

5.7 Complex (Organised or Multiple) Abuse

2. General Principles - Cases of organised or multiple abuse are often highly complex because of the number of children involved, the very serious nature of the allegations of abuse, the need for therapeutic input and the complex and time consuming nature of any consequent legal proceedings. Each investigation of

5.7 Complex (Organised or Multiple) Abuse

3. The Child - The single and most important consideration is the safety and well-being of the child or children. In reconciling the difference between the standard of evidence required for child protection purposes and the standard required for criminal proceedings, emphasis must be given to the protect

5.7 Complex (Organised or Multiple) Abuse

4. Action on Receipt of Information or Referral - A referral may be made to the Surrey Children's Services or a complaint made to the Police. In both cases a referral needs to be made to Surrey Children's Services and an initial Strategy Discussion held between the relevant Team Manager of Surrey Children's Services and the relevant Manag

5.8 Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority Claims for Looked After Children

RELATED GUIDANCE A Guide to the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme 2012 AMENDMENT This chapter was updated in September 2014.

5.8 Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority Claims for Looked After Children

10. When a Young Person is 18 - When the young person reaches the age of 18 years, responsibility for handling the money awarded by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority will be handed over to him/her unless he/she is felt to be incapable of dealing with it. If the CICA receive evidence which shows it would not be

5.8 Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority Claims for Looked After Children

4. Making an Application - Applications can be made: Online, at Gov.uk;and By telephone to the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority. Customer Service Centre advisors can assist in making a claim over the telephone. Supporting Evidence The following supporting evidence must be supplied: Proof of satisfaction of

5.8 Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority Claims for Looked After Children

5. Accepting a Payment - Legal advice should be sought without delay as to whether or not the offer should be accepted. The acceptance form must be completed and returned within 56 days of it being sent. If it is not returned within 56 days, and no written request has been made for a review or an extension of tim

5.8 Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority Claims for Looked After Children

6. Reviewing Decisions - If legal advice is received that the decision should be reviewed, written application for a review must be submitted within 56 days of the date of the original decision. A review form will be sent with the decision. Any additional evidence in support of the claim must be submitted. If it

5.8 Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority Claims for Looked After Children

7. Appealing Decisions - A review decision can be challenged by appealing, within 90 days of the date of the review decision, to the First-tier Tribunal (Criminal Injuries Compensation). An appeal form will be sent with the review decision. The form and supporting evidence should be sent to: First-tier Tribunal (

5.8 Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority Claims for Looked After Children

3. Timescales - In general, applications must be made within 2 years of the event giving rise to the claim. Different rules apply, however, where the applicant was under 18 years of age on the date of the incident. The application should always be made as soon as possible. However, the CICA recognise that

5.8 Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority Claims for Looked After Children

2. Eligibility - A child/young person may be eligible if they: Were a direct victim of a crime of violence; Were not to blame for the incident; Sustained an injury while taking an exceptional and justified risk, while trying to remedy or prevent a crime; Sustained a mental injury as a result of witnessing

5.8 Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority Claims for Looked After Children

8. The Award - Payment of compensation is usually by a single lump sum, but if the medical situation is unclear, one or more interim payments may be made. No compensation will be paid until the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority receives an acceptance of the award in writing. Every effort must ther

5.8 Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority Claims for Looked After Children

9. Advancing Money from the Award to the Child - The CICA may allow advances if these are needed for the child’s sole benefit, education or welfare (not for general spending money).  They may consider making a full payment if the child is 16 or 17 years of age and living independently. The CICA will need evidence (normally a receipt)

5.8 Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority Claims for Looked After Children

1. Introduction - The Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme is a government-funded scheme to compensate victims of violent crime, administered by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA).  Where aLooked After child appears to qualify (see Section 2, Eligibility), legal advice must always be soug

5.9 Diplomats' Families

2. Action by Surrey Children's Services and Police - It is important in all these case to establish whether diplomatic immunity may be claimed and to what extent. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office are prepared to give advice on this point and the first line manager should contact the ‘immunities section of the Protocol Department’. Out

5.9 Diplomats' Families

1. Legal Position - Where there is concern that a child who is a member of a diplomat’s family has suffered, or is likley to suffer Significant Harm, caution must be exercised in taking protective measures. Diplomats and members of their household have immunity from civil, criminal and administrative jurisd

6.1 Risk Management of Individuals Who Pose a Risk of Harm to Children

4. Release of Individuals who Pose a Risk to Children - When a prisoner identified as posing a risk to children is to be released at the end of her/his sentence, the Head of Surrey Children's Services and Chief Probation Officer must, prior to the release date, be informed by the prison probation officer. If there are children at the household

6.1 Risk Management of Individuals Who Pose a Risk of Harm to Children

6. Assessment of Young People who may Pose a Risk to Children - This procedure should be considered along with Children Displaying Harmful Sexual Behaviour Procedure. There is a need to distinguish between those young people under the age of eighteen who pose a significant risk to children and those who do not and where the circumstances of an offence

6.1 Risk Management of Individuals Who Pose a Risk of Harm to Children

7. Disclosure of Information by Local Authority - This procedure applies when disclosure to third parties of information relating to the previous history of an Individual who poses a Risk to Children is being considered. Subject to the conditions set out in Information Sharing Procedure, the general presumption is that information should

6.1 Risk Management of Individuals Who Pose a Risk of Harm to Children

3. Developing Intelligence About Organised or Persistent Offenders - Surrey Police Public Protection Investigation Units (PPIU) develop intelligence about organised or persistent offenders who pose a risk to children. Surrey Police has a dedicated Registration & Assessment Officer (RAO) responsible for the: Collation and dissemination of relevant intell

6.1 Risk Management of Individuals Who Pose a Risk of Harm to Children

5. Parole or Temporary Release of Individuals who may Pose a Risk to Children - When a prisoner identified as posing a risk to children is being considered for parole or is to be released from custody on a temporary basis, the prison probation officer must, in writing inform the Head of Surrey Children's Services for the area where the prisoner is expected to reside o

6.1 Risk Management of Individuals Who Pose a Risk of Harm to Children

2. Multi Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) - The full MAPPA guidance is available at Ministry of Justice website The Sex Offenders Act 1997 requires those (of any age) who are cautioned or convicted of specified sexual offences against a child (or certain very serious sexual offences against adults) to inform the police of changes of

6.1 Risk Management of Individuals Who Pose a Risk of Harm to Children

1. Identification of Individuals who Pose a Risk of Harm to Children - The terms ‘Schedule One Offender’ and ‘Schedule One Offence’ have been commonly used for anyone convicted of an offence against a child listed in Schedule One of the Children and Young Persons Act 1933. These terms are no longer used and have been replaced with the term ‘Individu

6.2 Children Visiting Custodial Settings

12. Appeals Process - All prison establishments have procedures for prisoners who wish to appeal a decision to restrict contact or not to permit any contact at all with a child. If the prisoner wishes to challenge the information held on file, the information provided by other agencies should only be disclosed

6.2 Children Visiting Custodial Settings

7. The Decision - The operational manager with delegated authority in the prison establishment, normally the Head of Resettlement or through care, who has responsibility for Public Protection, will make the assessment using the available multi agency information. The decision must take into account the foll

6.2 Children Visiting Custodial Settings

8. Level of Contact Decided - The operational manager should decide the level of contact that will be permitted. It should be proportionate to the risk identified and the best interests of the child should always be the overriding principle in making these decisions. Contact restrictions should be incremental and one o

6.2 Children Visiting Custodial Settings

10. Correct Identification of Children - It is necessary to take steps to prevent a child being substituted with another possibly more vulnerable child where visits take place. Prison staff monitoring calls, correspondence and visiting areas need to be vigilant and prevent any inappropriate contact where identified. Four passport

6.2 Children Visiting Custodial Settings

11. Reviewing Contact Decisions - Where a decision has been made to restrict contact, the decision will be reviewed when there is reason to believe that circumstances have changed. Reviews can be made at any time on the initiative of prison staff or at the request of the prisoner. It is good practice to review decisions ev

6.2 Children Visiting Custodial Settings

6. The Multi Agency Assessment - In order for the prison establishment to undertake the risk assessment to determine the risk to which a child might be exposed and the risk that a prisoner presents, it must contact and gather information from a range of agencies: The police in the child’s home authority must be contacte

6.2 Children Visiting Custodial Settings

9. Monitoring - The level and frequency of monitoring will be proportionate to the risk identified. Monitoring should focus on whether the prisoner is attempting to contact children inappropriately and what references about children are made in general correspondence i.e. grooming or manipulation of a chi

6.2 Children Visiting Custodial Settings

1. Introduction - The Prison Service Order (ref no 4410) sets out a range of measures to reduce the risks that certain prisoners, especially those convicted of, or charged with offences against children, may present to children whilst in prison. This order imposes a number of mandatory actions on prison gov

6.2 Children Visiting Custodial Settings

5. Looked After Children - When a prison establishment contacts Surrey Children's Services as part of the multi agency assessment and the child is Looked After, the local authority’s view about the appropriateness of contact must be obtained in writing. The test is always whether contact is in the child’s best i

6.2 Children Visiting Custodial Settings

2. Definition - Contact with a child includes correspondence, prisoner’s telephones or social visits. Telephone contact will include any access to office telephones where permission has been granted. It will also include any contact with children who have been invited to visit the prison as part of a gr

6.2 Children Visiting Custodial Settings

SCOPE OF THIS CHAPTER This chapter sets out the procedures for managing risks and safeguarding the wellbeing of children and young people, who may be visiting or having contact with adults or other young people who are in a custodial setting. Clear and timely communications are essential t

6.2 Children Visiting Custodial Settings

4. Parental Support for Contact - The prison establishment should ask the parent of the child whether they support contact. Surrey Children's Services for the area where the child is living should ascertain the wishes and feelings of the child during a home visit. For the visit to take place, Surrey Children's Services mus

6.2 Children Visiting Custodial Settings

3. Contact Requests - If a prisoner wishes to apply to have child contact, the enquiring Prison Officer must provide an application form for the prisoner to complete. A separate request must be made for contact with each individual child. It is possible that a request for contact could be made by a parent or fr

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

6. Visiting Special Hospitals - Ashworth, Broadmoor and Rampton - Specialist hospitals have procedures specifically developed for the service about child visiting. The decision to permit a child to visit a unit must always be based on: The interests of the child; The service user’s offending history; The clinical history of the service user; The condit

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

7. The Child - The request for a child to visit must be in respect of a child within the permitted categories of relationship as set out in the Directions and associated guidance to Ashworth, Broadmoor and Rampton Hospital Authorities (HSC 1999/160 as amended by LAC 2000 (18)) and the guidance as set out

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

10. Action by Nominated Officer to Consider a Visit - If the previous steps have been taken and the hospital’s assessment of risk of harm posed by the patient to the child does not rule out a visit, the nominated officer must: Contact the Head of Surrey Children's Services where the child resides to request advice on whether the visit is in

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

11. Action by the Safeguarding Unit -  On receipt of the request from the hospital the Safeguarding Manager will: Evaluate the information; Check any information across electronic and manual records held by the Surrey Children's Services to see if the child is known; and Contact the relevant Surrey Children's Services team wh

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

5. The Arrangements for Visits - The hospital or mental health trust providing the service must ensure that the facilities for contact are conducive to the child’s safety and promotes good quality contact for both child and patient. Children should have appropriate supervision when they are visiting mental health servic

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

8. The Request for a Visit - The Directions impose a duty on the Hospital to appoint a nominated officer to consider a request by a patient for a child to visit. If the child is within the permitted categories of relationship the nominated officer should: Obtain written permission from the patient to contact those wit

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

2. Visiting Patients in Psychiatric Wards - When children visit adult patients, all psychiatric in-patient settings should: Place child welfare at the heart of professional practice for all staff involved in the assessment, treatment and care of patients; Take account of the needs and wishes of children as well as patients; Address

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

12. The Surrey Children's Services Assessment - The Surrey Children's Services Service should contact those with Parental Responsibility and those caring for the child (if they are different) as part of the assessment and should seek to establish: The child’s legal relationship with the named patient; The quality of the child’s rela

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

SCOPE OF THIS CHAPTER This chapter sets out the procedures for managing risks and safeguarding the wellbeing of children and young people, who may be visiting or having contact with adults or other young people who are in a psychiatric ward or special hospital. See the legislation and guid

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

1. Introduction - Safe and regular contact for children should be promoted with patients in psychiatric facilities, whenever it is appropriate to maintain relationships which are of importance to the child. The child’s interests must remain paramount and take precedence over the interests of the adults in

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

3. Pre-visit Arrangements - When a compulsory admission is planned for an adult who is a parent, the approved mental health professional must assess the children’s needs and the suitability of arrangements for their care. If there are any concerns, the Surrey Children's Services should undertake an assessment and m

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

4. The Decision about Visits - The ward manager is responsible for the decision to allow a visit by a child. When a visit by a child is expected, the ward manager should consider the available information about the child alongside the assessment of the patient’s needs for treatment and care and of the current state of

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

9. Parental Consent to Visit - If those with Parental Responsibility state that they are prepared to allow their child to visit the patient, the nominated officer should arrange for the patient’s clinical team to undertake an assessment. This assessment is to judge the level of risk, if any, presented by the patient t

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

13. The Decision - The completed assessment report must be sent within a month to the nominated officer at the hospital, who will discuss the recommendations with Surrey Children's Services and make a decision about the visit taking into account any potential risk posed by the patient and the potential risk

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

15. Refusing a Visit - There are five circumstances in which the nominated officer must refuse to allow a child to visit. These are if: The relationship between the child and the patient is not within the permitted categories of relationship as set out in the Directions. The nominated officer must notify the pat

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

16. Medium Secure Hospitals - Medium secure hospitals have patients who are detained under the Mental Health Act who are significantly disturbed and may be in hospital for lengthier periods of time, often in excess of a year. The process for agreeing visits operates with a similar degree of formality as those for speci

6.3 Children Visiting Psychiatric Wards and Special Hospitals

14. The Visit - Where visits are agreed, the hospital remains responsible for maintaining an overview of the risks, which may vary according to the health of the patient, other environmental factors and the impact on the child if visiting is allowed. This may involve further liaison with the Surrey Childr

7.1 Complaints about Child Protection Conferences

9. Communicating the Panel's Decisions and Recommendations - The Panel Chair will write to the complainant and the Chair of the Conference within 5 days of its meeting explaining the Panel's decisions and any recommendations. All Panel responses will be considered at the Quality Assurance and Evaluation Sub-Group and progressed as appropriate.

7.1 Complaints about Child Protection Conferences

8. Decisions and Recommendations by the Complaints Panel - The Complaints Panel must reach a majority decision on the basis of whether the Child Protection Conference Procedures were followed correctly and therefore whether: The complaint is justified; The complaint is partially justified; Inconclusive with no further action; The complaint is not

7.1 Complaints about Child Protection Conferences

SCOPE OF THIS CHAPTER This chapter deals with complaints by Service Users and other eligible persons acting on their behalf. AMENDMENT This chapter was reviewed and revised for the May 2011 edition of the manual.

7.1 Complaints about Child Protection Conferences

10. Reconvened Conference - The Chair of a reconvened Child Protection Conference must ensure that all those present have seen or are briefed at the start of the Conference about the recommendations reached by the Panel. A distinction must be made by the Conference Chair between the need to discuss the conclusions of

7.1 Complaints about Child Protection Conferences

7. Stage 2 - The Complaints Panel - The Conference Chair's line manager in liaison with the Head of Safeguarding Children Unit will make arrangements for the meeting of the Complaints Panel. The role of the Panel Chair will normally be fulfilled by one of the members of the Complaints Panel. The Panel membership should inclu

7.1 Complaints about Child Protection Conferences

11. Further Challenges - A person making a complaint who remains dissatisfied may wish to pursue their grievance via the Local Government Ombudsman or seek legal advice about other legal remedies such as Judicial Review.

7.1 Complaints about Child Protection Conferences

4. Outcomes of the Complaint - The person making the complaint will receive one of these outcomes: The complaint is referred to the relevant agency procedure; A new child Protection Conference will be convened with a different Conference Chair; The present Child Protection Conference with the same Conference Chair will

7.1 Complaints about Child Protection Conferences

2. Exclusion from this Complaint Procedure - Where the complaint is in relation to the practice of a specific agency, the person who made the complaint will be directed to that agency's internal complaints procedure e.g. the complaint is that the social worker's report to the conference was not shared with the parents in good time pr

7.1 Complaints about Child Protection Conferences

1. Complaints Eligibility - The following people are the only ones who can make a complaint: The child who is the subject of the Child Protection Conference, where s/he is of a sufficient age and understanding; A person who is acting on behalf of and at the written request of the child, where the child is of a suffic

7.1 Complaints about Child Protection Conferences

6. Stage 1 - Exploration by Conference Chair's line Manager - Where the complaint concerns the personal conduct of the Conference Chair, the Conference Chair's line manager will contact Customer Relations to agree whether the Children Act's process or other process is appropriate. Where this complaints process is deemed appropriate the Conference Cha

7.1 Complaints about Child Protection Conferences

3. Areas covered by this Complaints Procedure - The things that happen The process, conduct or administration of the conference; Compliance with the Surrey Child Protection Procedures and other protocols about Child Protection Conferences; The exclusion of any person from the Conference; The outcome, in terms of the decision that the ch

7.1 Complaints about Child Protection Conferences

5. Immediate Resolution - An expressed concern about the Conference itself, which arises in the course of the meeting, must be noted and an attempt made by the Conference Chair to resolve it with the child or parent or other person eligible to make a complaint. Information about the nature of the concern and how it

7.2 Resolution of Professional Disagreement

4. Where Professional Differences Remain - If professional disagreements remain unresolved, the matter must be referred to the heads of service for each agency involved. In the unlikely event that the issue is not resolved by the steps described above and/or the discussions raise significant policy issues, it may be helpful to conv

7.2 Resolution of Professional Disagreement

3. Disagreement Regarding the Implementation of the Child Protection Plan - Concern or disagreement may arise over another professionals decisions, actions or lack of actions in the implementation of the Child Protection Plan, including Core Group meetings - see Implementing the Child Protection Plan (including Lead Social Worker and Core Group Responsibilities) P

7.2 Resolution of Professional Disagreement

1. Disagreement at Enquiry Stage - Disagreements over the handling of concerns reported to Surrey Children's Services typically occur when: The referral is not considered to meet eligibility criteria for assessment by the Surrey Children's Services; Informal advice is sought and a social worker has concluded that a referral

7.2 Resolution of Professional Disagreement

2. Disagreement at Child Protection Conference - If the Conference Chair is unable to achieve a consensus as to whether or not the child should be made subject to a Child Protection Plan, s/he will make a decision and note any dissenting views within the child protection conference minutes. The person(s) with the dissenting view(s) must

7.3 Inter-Agency Escalation Policy and Procedure

1. Introduction - Occasionally situations may arise when workers within one agency feel that the decisions made by a worker from another agency, on a child protection case is not a safe decision. Disagreements could arise in a number of areas, but are most likely to arise around: Level of need / Risk assess

7.3 Inter-Agency Escalation Policy and Procedure

4. Professional Dissent at Child Protection Conferences - In any situation where it becomes apparent that professionals disagree about the need or otherwise for Child Protection Plan, the relevant professionals, where possible, will discuss this before the conference. When a conference does not reach a unanimous decision, the chair offers profess

7.3 Inter-Agency Escalation Policy and Procedure

2. Aim and Objectives - To avoid disputes that: Detract from the focus on the child; Delay decision making; Resolve difficulties within and between agencies. To identify and anticipate problem areas in working together where there is a lack of clarity and to promote resolution via amendment to protocols and proce

7.3 Inter-Agency Escalation Policy and Procedure

3. Inter-Agency Escalation Procedure for Professionals with Child Protection or Child Welfare Concerns - Click here to view 'Inter-Agency Escalation Procedure for Professionals with Child Protection or Child Welfare Concerns' flowchart. At all stages of the Escalation Procedure actions and decisions must be shared in a timely manner with appropriate staff who are directly involved with the se

7.3 Inter-Agency Escalation Policy and Procedure

Inter-agency Escalation Policy: Resolution of professional disagreements in work relating to the safety of children.  

8.1 Reviewing Deaths of All Children - Role of the Child Death Overview Panel

3. Child Death Overview Panel - The Child Death Overview Panel will have a permanent core membership drawn from the key organisations represented on the Board although not all core members will necessarily be involved in discussing all cases. It should include a professional from Public Health as well as Child Health. Ot

8.1 Reviewing Deaths of All Children - Role of the Child Death Overview Panel

1. Introduction - The Surrey Safeguarding Children Board (SSCB) has responsibility for reviewing the deaths of all children other than still births or planned terminations that are within the law through the arrangements of a Child Death Overview Panel (CDOP). The Panel will have a fixed core membership dra

8.1 Reviewing Deaths of All Children - Role of the Child Death Overview Panel

2. Notification of a Child’s Death - Deaths should be notified by the professional confirming the fact of the child’s death. For unexpected deaths this will be at the same time as they inform the Coroner and the Designated Paediatrician for unexpected deaths in childhood. The CDOP co-ordinator should be notified as soon as

8.1 Reviewing Deaths of All Children - Role of the Child Death Overview Panel

RELATED CHAPTER This chapter should be read in conjunction with the Unexpected Death of a Child Procedure. AMENDMENT This chapter was updated in May 2016 to include information on the role and functions of the Child Death Overview Panel (CDOP). Links to the Child Death Notification forms w

8.2 Unexpected Child Deaths

4. The Involvement of the Coroner and Pathologist - If a doctor is not able to issue a medical certificate of the cause of death, the Lead Professional or Investigator must report the child's death to the Coroner in accordance with a protocol agreed with the local Coronial service. The Coroner must investigate violent or unnatural death, or

8.2 Unexpected Child Deaths

3. Care of Parents and Family Members - Where a child has died in or been taken to a hospital, the parents should be allocated a member of hospital staff to support and keep them informed throughout the process. The parents should normally be given the opportunity to hold and spend time with their baby or child (including in the

8.2 Unexpected Child Deaths

2. Responding to the Unexpected Death of a Child - Immediate Response to the Unexpected Death of a Child in the Community - First Professional on the Scene. If the first professionals on the scene are not medical professionals, then they must obtain urgent medical assistance as the first priority. The Ambulance service or GP / Doctor shoul

8.2 Unexpected Child Deaths

5. The Involvement of the Police - The police must be informed of all child deaths. Police attendance should be kept to the minimum required and officers need to be sensitive to the distress caused by uniforms, marked police cars, personal radios and mobile phones. A substantive Detective Sergeant, or above, must attend all

8.2 Unexpected Child Deaths

7. Multi-agency Working - Rapid Response Planning Meeting/discussion The Specialist Nurse in conjunction with the Designated Paediatrician with responsibility for unexpected deaths in childhood must convene a Rapid Response planning meeting/discussion (usually via telephone/email communications) within 24 hours of

8.2 Unexpected Child Deaths

1. Introduction - Definition An unexpected death is defined as the death of an infant or child (less than 18 years old) which was not anticipated as a significant possibility 24 hours before the death or where there was a similarly unexpected collapse or incident leading to or precipitating the events which

8.2 Unexpected Child Deaths

The following procedures apply whenever there is an unexpected death, whether the child was in the care of a parent, foster carer, children’s home, boarding school, child minder, day care provider, hospital or any other provider or any other carer. It should be read in conjunction with t

8.2 Unexpected Child Deaths

6. The Involvement of Surrey Children’s Services - The duty manager at Surrey Children's Services must check records on notification of an unexpected child death. If the child and/or family are known to Surrey Children’s Services (open or closed case) other than merely through school attendance at a local or other school or registered da

9.1 Learning and Improvement Framework

AMENDMENT This chapter was updated in July 2017.

9.1 Learning and Improvement Framework

7. Components of the learning and improvement framework - The following is an outline of key learning and improvement process and activity in relation to the SSCB learning and improvement model. Notifiable Incidents A notifiable incident is an incident involving the care of a child which meets any of the following criteria: A child has died (incl

9.1 Learning and Improvement Framework

1. Introduction - The Surrey Safeguarding Children Board (SSCB) Learning and Improvement Framework promotes learning from experience and from reviews against standards. It reinforces continuous improvement in partner agencies and all local organisations who work with children and families. The SSCB Learning

9.1 Learning and Improvement Framework

10. Dissemination of Learning - Wide dissemination of learning outcomes will be a key part of embedding learning into practice. The SSCB will: Facilitate multi-agency learning events for professionals involved in specific cases Provide targeted workshops to support partners in embedding learning into practice change and

9.1 Learning and Improvement Framework

Appendix A: Types of Review - Serious Case Review Where cases meet criteria for a Serious Case Review as set out in Regulation 5 of the LSCB Regulations 2006, review activity is proportionate to the specific circumstances of the case. Strategic Case Review Group will recommend the most appropriate methodology for condu

9.1 Learning and Improvement Framework

9. Measuring the Impact and Outcomes of Learning Improvements - The SSCB through the Quality Assurance Group and the Learning and Development Group will ensure that processes are in place to measure the impact and/or outcome of learning improvements, intervention or training. The measures used will be both quantitative and qualitative. Multi-agency tra

9.1 Learning and Improvement Framework

6.Interface with Quality Assurance and Performance Management - One of the objectives of this framework is to help the SSCB understand and assure itself with regard to safeguarding children in Surrey. The framework alone cannot tell the SSCB everything it needs to know but should be understood as part of a broad range of information the SSCB analyses a

9.1 Learning and Improvement Framework

8. Principles for Conducting Audits - The SSCB has adopted the standards applied by Surrey County Council when conducting multi-agency audits and case file reviews. Please visit www.surreyscb.org.uk/quality assurance & evaluation for guidance and standards applied by the SSCB when conducting audits. Working Together 2015 C

9.1 Learning and Improvement Framework

5. SSCB Learning & Improvement Model - The following table provides further details to support the model:

9.1 Learning and Improvement Framework

2. Principles for learning and improvement - The principles underpinning the learning and improvement framework as outlined in Working Together 2015 are: There should be a culture of continuous learning and improvement across the organisations that work together to safeguard and promote the welfare of children, identifying opportunit

9.1 Learning and Improvement Framework

3. Surrey Safeguarding Children Board (SSCB) Commitment - The SSCB is committed to supporting the development of a culture of continuous learning across member agencies and through the development and maintenance of this framework will respond to local and national policies and agendas. SSCB will promote learning from a ‘full range of reviews a

9.1 Learning and Improvement Framework

4. Roles and Responsibilities - Partner agencies and all local organisations that work with children and families are expected to endorse this framework and embed it into workforce learning and development policies. Partner agencies and local organisations are responsible for: Providing staff and other resources to deliv

10.1 Local Contact Details

This list of Contacts was correct at the time of publication. A more detailed list of contacts and any subsequent changes to this Contact List which occur before the publication of the next update will be shown on the Surrey SSCB website. If you wish to make a referral regarding a child pl

10.1 Local Contact Details

HOW SURREY SERVICES FOR FAMILIES CAN HELP YOU - ACT (Advice, Consultation and Therapy for young people with sexually harmful behaviours) Tel: 01483 519606 Email: act@surreycc.gov.uk Acute Hospital Services & Community Health Services East Surrey Hospital Named Paediatrician: Katie Mcglone East Surrey HospitalCanada AvenueRedhill

10.2 Amendments

May 2016 Updated Chapters Chapter Name Change Guidance in relation to Managing Allegations against Staff, Carers and Volunteers Risk Assessment for Suspension - Pro Forma; Risk by Association Employee Assessment - Pro Forma; Summary of Child Protection Allegation/Concern to be kept on Pers

10.2 Amendments

Archive - December 2015 Updated Chapters Chapter Name Change A Multi-agency Protocol for the Management of Actual or Suspected bruising in Infants who are Not Independently Mobile This chapter was added to the manual replacing the previous procedure - 'Bruising in Children who are Not Independentl

This page is correct as printed on Thursday 21st of September 2017 08:51:20 AM please refer back to this website (http://surreyscb.procedures.org.uk) for updates.
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